Screen

Profile

Layout

Direction

Menu Style

Cpanel

WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S RALLY AGAINST THE SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V. WADE

BELOW PICTURE: Women's March Cleveland Head Organizer Kathy Wray Coleman (2nd from left) leads 2,500 people in a march for reproductive rights on Oct 2, 2021 on Market Square in Cleveland, Ohio. It was one of the largest marches in the country that day. Photo and coverage by the Plain Dealer and Cleveland.com. CLICK HERE TO GO GO TO CLEVELAND.COM TO READ ON THE COVERAGE OF THE EVENT

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

BELOW PICTURE AND UPDATE:

SATURDAY, JUNE 11, 2022-NOON-2PM

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS  TO BE ANNOUNCED

EVENT CONTACT TEL: WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND (216) 659-0473

Women's March Cleveland's Save Roe Rally & March for Civil

Rights and against the U.S. Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade

is Sat., June 11, 2022, noon- 2pm, City Hall steps in

Cleveland, Ohio, 600 Lakeside Avenue E  44114

CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE FACEBOOK EVENT PAGE FOR WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S RALLY & MARCH AGAINST THE U.S. SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V. WADE

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S RALLY & MARCH AGAINST THE U.S. SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V WADE AT MOBILIZEUS.COM




Planned Parenthhood's May 14 Northeast Ohio 'Bans Off Our Bodies' march in Cleveland draws only hundreds after outside organizers snub local Black Women's March organizers, and nationally the event failed to draw mass crowds in big cities

E-mail Print PDF

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.comTel (216) 659-0473 Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com

CLEVELAND, Ohio. After snubbing local Women's March organizers, Planned Parenthood's "Bans Off Our Bodies" marches in Northeast Ohio in Cleveland and elsewhere nationally failed to garner the mass crowd that was expected on Saturday in spite of the corporate-funded group spending thousands upon thousands of dollars for Facebook and other ads for the national initiative. And while a few media outlets covered the event, organizers of Cleveland's rally and march, who did not reside in Cleveland and were from Columbus and Akron, Ohio, got absolutely no pre coverage of the event from Cleveland's mainstream media. (Editor's note: Women's March Cleveland will rally and march Sat. June 11 at noon on the steps of Cleveland City Hall before the U.S. Supreme Court issues its decision in a Mississippi case where the court is set to overturn Roe v. Wade and more than a thousand have already responded on Facebook for the event. Click here to register on Facebook for the open-to-the-public event in June. Click here to register for the event at mobilize us). The event contact tel is (216) 659-0473.

In Cleveland, for instance, which was dubbed the Northeast Ohio regional Bans Off Our Bodies, only hundreds came out to Willard Park in downtown Cleveland, according to the Cleveland Plain Dealer Newspaper, Ohio's largest newspaper. Also, Blacks and elected officials in the majority Black major American city of some 372,000 people stayed away in droves. Organizers had predicted that thousands would turnout, like they did on Oct 2, 2021 for Women's March Cleveland's mass reproductive march, but to no avail.

"They failed to engage the media and the community and were largely ineffective in Cleveland and elsewhere because they are inexperienced organizers who snubbed and disrespected  local women's march organizers in the respective cities, including in Cincinnati, Columbus, Dayton and Cleveland," said Women's March Cleveland head organizer Kathy Wray Coleman. She went on to say that "the event in Cleveland lacked diversity and Black people, and the inexperienced organizers of Planned Parenthood actually cursed out local women's march organizers in Cleveland."

The absence primarily of local leaders in a largely Black city also puzzled Coleman, a seasoned Black community organizer who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper for 17 years as a reporter, a historical Black print weekly published in Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati. Also, she said, there is a gubernatorial and a U.S. Senate race in Ohio, and congressional and other races, and none of the candidates spoke as the November midterm elections loom. That too, said Coleman, is a reflection on the organizers.

A former Cleveland schools high school biology teacher and longtime community activist and local reporter who also leads the Imperial Women Coalition and International Women's Day March Cleveland, Coleman is Black and has been a head organizer of Women's March Cleveland's mass rallies since 2018 when some 6,000 people turned out, up from 2,500 people on Market Square on Oct 2, 2021 who participated in a reproductive rights rally and march that included Black speakers, local community activists, and a diverse group of area elected officials.

The other reason they were ineffective, said Coleman, is that  unlike Women's March Cleveland, which includes a coalition of local organizations at each major rally and march, Planned Parenthood is corporate funded and is run primarily by  Washington insiders with no ties to the community, let alone the Black community.  She said that "they thought they could buy successful mass marches in Cleveland and nationwide while simultaneously excluding experienced Black local organizers, and they could not."

Coleman called Saturday's rally  and march of mainly out-of-towners in Cleveland by Planned Parenthood's disgruntled outside organizers "divisive and mediocre at best."

Moreover, the local Cleveland activist and organizer said that Women's March National and Planned Parenthood were both unprepared when the leak came down in early May that the U.S. Supreme Court is set to overturn Roe v Wade this summer.

Women's March Cleveland, she, said, which has ties to the national group but remains independent locally since divisive conflict in 2019 between Women's March National and the Jewish community, will be prepared to rally and march and is organizing now with a noon march on June 11 on the steps of Cleveland City Hall before the Supreme Court issues its decision to overturn Roe v Wade, likely in late June.The rally and march will also address Civil and voting rights since Clevelabd is a largely Black city.

Roe v Wade is the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case that made abortion legal nationwide. When it is overturned this summer by the Supreme Court the states will then have authority to regulate or dismantle abortions, and most of the nation's state legislatures are predominantlty Republican like in Texas where abortion after six weeks of pregnancy has been unlawful since September of last year, per a new state law.

 

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Monday, 23 May 2022 17:58

Karine-Jean Pierre to become the nation's first Black female White House press secretary and was tapped by President Joe Biden for the prestigious post....By Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio's Black digital news leader

E-mail Print PDF
Pictured is Karine Jean-Pierre, whom President Joe Biden has named as his second White House secretary, the first Black woman to hold the post in U.S.history


Clevelandurbannews.com
and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com

WASHINGTON, D.C-President Biden has named Karine Jean-Pierre as his White House press  to replace Jen Psaki later this month, Jean-Pierre the first Black women in U.S. history to be named to the pretigious post.

She has been Psaki's deputy since the start of the administration and stood in for her on occasion, including when she was out was COVID-19. She will  also be the the first openly gay person in the prestigius role of speaking for the president and the U.S. government and holding in press briefings that are watched in venues internationally.

"Karine not only brings the experience, talent and integrity needed for this difficult job, but she will continue to lead the way in communicating about the work of the Biden-Harris Administration on behalf of the American people," Biden said in a statement. "Jill and I have known and respected Karine a long time and she will be a strong voice speaking for me and this administration."

Jean-Pierre, 47,  said at Thursday's press briefing, where she appeared with Psaki, that her new White House assignment "is a historic moment, and it's not lost on me."

Previously, Jean-Pierre was the senior advisor and national spokeswoman for MoveOn.org and a political analyst for NBC News and MSNBC. She is also a former lecturer in international and public affairs at Columbia University. She has worked at the Center for Community and Corporate Ethics, and in December 2018, The Haitian Times named her one of six "Haitian Newsmakers Of The Year".[I, May 2022 Forbes described Jean-Pierre as having been a "prominent Democratic activist

As of 2020, Jean-Pierre lives in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area with her partner, CNN correspondent Suzanne Malveaux, and their daughter. She is fluent in English, French, and Haitian Creole

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.coma , the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.


Last Updated on Sunday, 22 May 2022 16:45

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio's leader in Black and alternative digital news

E-mail Print PDF

President Biden's former speech writer Jeff Nussbaum to speak at the City Club of Cleveland via an in-person event on speech writing and on his book 'Undelivered: The Never-Heard Speeches That Would Have Rewritten History'....By Clevelandurbannews.com

E-mail Print PDF

register today!

CLEVELAND, Ohio- President Joe Biden's former senior speech writer, Jeff Nussbaum, will keynote a forum on speech writing hosted by the City Club of Cleveland on Fri, May 20 , an in person event. He will also do a book signing relative to his book titled " Undelivered: The Never-Heard Speeches that Would Have Rewritten History." Email info@cityclub.org with any questions.

The forum, which begins at noon following an 11:30an lunch and requires purchased tickets, is part of the Authors in Conversation series and is sponsored by the John P. Murphy Foundation through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.

Speeches have the power to educate, incite, and inspire. But for almost every delivered speech there exists an undelivered opposite. These "second speeches" provide a tantalizing, sometimes terrifying window into what could have been if not for changes of heart or momentous turns of events.

In Undelivered: The Never-Heard Speeches that Would Have Rewritten History, Nussbaum presents the most notable speeches that were never heard from Dwight Eisenhower's apology for a D-Day failure to Richard Nixon's refusal to resign the presidency, and even Hillary Clinton's acceptance for a 2016 victory—the latter never seen until now.

Jeff Nussbaum is an adjunct professor of public communication at American University in Washington, D.C.  and a partner in the speechwriting and strategy firm West Wing Writers. He has previously served as a speechwriter for Vice President Biden when he was vice president under president Barck Obama, and for  former vice president Al Gore, and Senate former Majority Leader Tom Daschle. More recently Nussbaum oversaw all speechwriting operations for the 2012 Democratic National Convention. In addition to his speechwriting experience, hewas the co-author and collaborator with James Carville on the 2003 bestseller

Join the City Club of Cleveland for this in person forum, a behind-the-scenes look at the power of speechwriting and what these second speeches can tell us about the past, and also inform our present.

After the forum, a book signing with Jeff Nussbaum will be available. Mac's Backs will be on site for book sales.

The City Club of Cleveland requires all attendees to provide proof of Covid vaccination or a recent negative Covid test. Learn more here

Email info@cityclub.org with any questions.

The City Club of Cleveland requires all attendees to provide proof of Covid vaccination or a recent negative Covid test. Learn more here

Email info@cityclub.org with any questions.


By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor. Coleman is a seasoned Black Cleveland journalist who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper for 17 years and an experienced investigative and political reporter. She is the most read independent journalist in Ohio per Alexa.com

Last Updated on Wednesday, 11 May 2022 14:11

Rich Strike wins 148th Kentucky Derby that went off with no major Breonna Taylor protests, Taylor Black and gunned down by Louisville-Metro police in 2020, an unprecedented killing by police that drew national protests and a $12 million settlement

E-mail Print PDF

Pictured are 2022 Kentucky Derby winner Rich Strike, who was ridden by jockey Sunny Leon, and the late Breonna Taylor, whom Louisville Metro police gunned down in March of 2020.

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com , the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.comBy Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor-in-chief

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor-in-chief

CLEVELANDURBANNEWS.COM, LOUISVILLE, Kentucky-Ridden by veteran jockey Sunny Leon and with odds of 80-1, Rich Strike edged Epicenter and Zandon to win the 148th running of the Kentucky Derby on Saturday at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Kentucky.

Unlike last year's Kentucky Derby, there were no major protests, or any at all for that matter, on behalf of Breonna Taylor, the 26-year-old Black woman who was arbitrarily gunned down by Metro-Louisville police in her apartment in 2020, a police shooting death that drew nationwide protests and a $12 million negligence and wrongful death settlement from the city for Taylor's family.

Trained by Eric R. Reed, the longshot race horse finished the mile and one-quarter race in first place, though he had never run in a Grade I race, horse racing experts calling his win "the anatomy of an upset."

Leon was ecstatic about riding his horse to victory, saying it was "a crazy Derby," and Reed added that running a quality stable paid off. He said that Rich Strike was pampered, and that, in turn, he performed well and rose to the occasion to bring home his first Derby win.

"We don't go out and buy the big horses," Reed told Louisville's Courier Journal Newspaper, Kentucky's largest newspaper. "We just try to have a good, quality stable. We always perform well, our percentages are always good. We take care of the horse first, and the rest falls into place."

The unprecedented victory was the greatest upset since 1913 when 91-1 long shot Donerail won the coveted race. And what was the payout for Saturday's race?

Rich Strike paid $163.60 to win with a $2 bet and only Donerail in 1913 had a higher payout of $184.90.A $2 exacta with second-place finisher Epicenter paid $4,101.20, a $1 trifecta paid $14,870.70, and the $1 superfecta paid $321,500.10. In addition to paying $163.60 to win, Rich Strike paid $163.60 to win, $74.20 to place and $29.40 to show. Second place finisher Epicenter paid $7.40 to place and $5.20 to show, and Zandon, who won third place, paid $5.60 to show.

The purse was $3 million, the same amount as last year and will be split between the top five finishers based upon ranking status. First place paid $1.86 million, which Rich Strike will carry home, and Epicenter will take home $600,000, followed by Zandon with $300,000. The fourth and fifth place winners, namely Simplication and Mo Donegal, will get $150,000 and $90,000.

If Rich Strike wins the Preakness and Belmont Stakes, the second and third legs of the Triple Crown respectively, he will have won the Triple Crown.

This year's derby was a far cry from the controversial event held last year at Churchill Downs when jockey John R. Velazquez teamed with trainer Bob Baffert for the second year in a row to win the Derby, only to have the purse money, and the victory, won by race horse Medina Spirit, snatched away for a doping violation

In spite of a still existing pandemic, Saturday's Derby brought Churchill Downs nearly back to full capacity of $150,000 like it had in 2019. Last year, only 52,000 Derby fans turned out.

And while last year's race drew protesters outside of Churchill Downs like in 2020, there were no protests this year in the Derby City as Louisville tries to repair its tainted image following national backlash from the March 13, 2020 Louisville Metro police killing of Taylor, who was unarmed and Black, and shot eight times in her apartment after police barged in via a no knock warrant and got in a shootout with her live-in boyfriend. No drugs were found on the premises

Around 50 protesters marched by the entrance of Churchill Downs on last year with signs that read, "We haven't forgotten Breonna."

Those protesters ended up at a Black Lives Matter march and at La Chasse restaurant where a confrontation with a man who allegedly pulled out a gun occurred, police said.

It remains unclear why the protesters at the Black Lives Matter march, two women and two men, and all of them Black, were arrested last year and taken into custody.

Taylor's shooting death, which drew some police reforms by the city, triggered local and countrywide protests, and riots, Taylor among a host of unarmed Blacks erroneously killed by White cops nationwide.

Only one of the three White Louisville Metro police officers directly involved in Taylor's tragic shooting death, fired detective Brett Hankison, was criminally charged. A grand jury indicted him on Sept. 23 on three counts of felony wanton endangerment for allegedly firing errant bullets into Taylor's apartment that penetrated a wall and entered an occupied apartment next door to Taylor's residence. But a jury, in early March, acquitted him on all three counts.

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor. Coleman is a seasoned Black Cleveland journalist who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper for 17 years and an experienced investigative and political reporter. She is the most read independent journalist in Ohio per Alexa.com

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 10 May 2022 09:54

Ohio Senator Nickie Antonio, state Rep Bride Rose Sweeney and activist Genevieve Mitchell to keynote Women's March Cleveland's 'Bans Off Our Bodies Seymour Avenue Anniversary Rally' on May 6, 2022 at 5:30 pm at 2207 Seymour Avenue in Cleveland

E-mail Print PDF

Pictured are Ohio Senator Nickie Antonio of Lakewood (D-OH) (wearing black), state Representative Bride Rose Sweeney (D-OH) of Cleveland (wearing maroon), and Cleveland activist Genevieve Mitchell (wearing scarf)

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com-CLEVELAND, Ohio-State Sen Nickie Antonio, state Rep Bride Rose Sweeney and longtime Cleveland activist Genevieve Mitchell are the keynote speakers for Women's March Cleveland and Imperial Women Coalition's "Bans Off Our Bodies Seymour Avenue Anniversary Rally & March" at 5:30 pm at 2207 Seymour Avenue in Cleveland in front of the late serial rapist Ariel Castro's since demolished home on Fri, May 6. It is the ninth year anniversary since Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight got away from Castro after a neighbor, upon hearing Berry's cry for help, broke down the home door and rescued her. (Contact organizers Kathy Wray Coleman at (216) 659-0473 and Alfred Porter Jr at (216) 804-7462 for

more information).

Organizers said that activists will also rally for the reproductive rights of women as to public policy changes in Ohio's state legislature and as the U.S. Supreme Court is set to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 Supreme Court decision that made abortion legal nationwide.


A local guitar player, divorced father of two, and former Cleveland schools bus driver, Castro hanged himself at 53-years-old in prison in September of 2013, a month into his life sentence without the possibility of parole. He was a sad character and a serial rapist of children and women.


Knight was a young woman when Castro abducted her, and DeJesus and Berry were teenagers. The kidnappings caught international attention and highlight the dangers women and girls face in Cleveland Ohio, which has been dubbed one of the most dangerous major American cities for Black women via data compiled by CityLab


Led by activist groups Women's Mrch Cleveland, Imperial Women Coalition, the Laura Cowan Foundation and Black on Black Crime Inc,  Clevelanders rally annually on the anniversary date of the escape of the Seymour Avenue  kidnapping victims, who were raped repeatedly by Castro. He even had the nerve to father a child by Berry during the ordeal, and would come to missings persons rallies sponsored by community activists and famly members of the captive woman and teens.


His since demolished home on Seymour Avenue, where he initially kept his three enslaved victims chained in the basement, would later come to be known in Hollywood terms as "the House of Horrors."

Activists, elected officials and community members and mothers of women and girls who have been raped and/or murdered in Cleveland are among the speakers at Friday's anniversray rally, and supporters of the Cleveland Rape Crisis Center and the Journey Center for Safety and Healing are also slated to attend the event, organizers said.


"Activists  will rally for the reproductive rights of women and we invite city and county officials to the event to come tell us what has been done to find missing women and children and to minimize violence against women in the largely Black city of Cleveland as crimes against women and girls, including rape and murder, continue to escalate," said activist Kathy Wray Coleman, who has been the head organizer of all but one of the Seymour Avenue anniversary rallies and is a former high school biology teacher who leads Women's March Cleveland and the Imperial Women Coalition (Editor's note: The Imperial Women Coalition was formed following the murders of 11 Black women by the late serial killer Anthony Sowell on Imperial Avenue on Cleveland's largely Black east side).


Activist Laura Cowan, a CNN Hero and domestic violence survivor, said that "while we are pleased that the Ariel Castro victims got to safety we still have so many more missing women who are not getting the attention they got, particularly women of color."


Cleveland activist women in particular say the anniversary event will also address the Violence Against Women Act, local, county, statewide and national public policy changes sought, and a demand for resources as to violence against women and children, human trafficking, and the epidemic of missing persons.
Statistics on nationwide violence against women and girls include the following:
-Violence against women and girls, including rape and murder, remains an epidemic, as does human trafficking
-Women and girls ages 12-34 are at the highest risk for sexual assault
-Poor women are 12 times more likely to get raped
-One out of every six American women has experience an attempted or completed rape and 22 percent of African-American women and 14 percent of Hispanic-American women experience at least one rape or attempted rape in a lifetime.

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.


Last Updated on Friday, 06 May 2022 00:49

Ads

harry jacob.jpg - 2.82 Kb

The annual11th Congressional District Caucus Parade is Monday, September 2

11th Congressional District Congresswoman Marcia L. Fudge, a Warrensville Heights Democrat who also chairs the Congressional Black Caucus of Blacks in Congress. waives to the crowd last year at the annual 11th Congressional District Caucus Parade.  This year's parade kicks off on Monday, September 2 on Cleveland's east side at 10:00 am from E. 149th Street and Kinsman Road and ends at Luke Easter Park where the picnic will begin. The event will be replete with political speeches and entertainment from various sources, including local musicians and bands. The well-attended caucus parade was initiated by Democrat Louis Stokes, the retired congressman before Fudge, and the tradition was furthered by the late Democratic Congresswoman Stephanie Tubbs Jones, Fudges' predecessor. Stokes was the first Black congressperson from Ohio and Tubbs Jones was the first Black congresswoman from Ohio