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Keynote speakers announced for Cleveland's January 21, 2023 march, a six-year anniversary of Women's March Cleveland and the 50th anniversary of Roe v Wade

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clevelandurbannews.com and www.kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com.

CLEVELAND, Ohio- Women in Cleveland  and Northeast Ohio will take to the streets in Cleveland on Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023  for Women's March Cleveland's sixth-year anniversary and to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Roe Wade, one of several sister marches nationwide the weekend of Jan 21. Keynote speakers are state Sen, Nickie Antonio, state Rep Juanita Brent, Cleveland Councilman Joe Jones, activist Genevieve Mitchell, Cleveland Domestic Violence Center CEO Melissa Graves, East Cleveland School Board President Dr. Mary Rice, Ohio Physicians for Reproductive Rights representative Dr. Lauren Beene, and Red, Wine and Blue CEO Katie Paris. A transgender student and University Hts Cleveland Hts student activist will also speak, coupled with brief presentations by Black on Black Crime Inc and Stand Up 4 Abortion Rights (The event contact tel is (216) 659-0473). (The event contact tel is (216) 659-0473).

The event will be gin with a 12:30 pm rally and march at Market Square Park at W. 25th Street and Lorain Avenue in the city's Ohio City neighborhood, and across from the Westside Market near downtown Cleveland. A 1:30pm march will follow. A march that Women's March Cleveland hosted at Market Square Park in October of 2021 for reproductive rights drew roughly 2,500 people and though Saturday's upcoming march will be smaller like other cities nationwide that are also holding sister rallies and marches to celebrate the anniversary of the now defunct Roe v Wade, it will draw a decent crowd, organizers said, and will be one of the largest sister marches nationwide this weekend.

Organizers said that hundreds are expected. The women say that they are marching for reproductive rights and abortion access, voting and Civil Rights, and to seek to eradicate violence against women Also at issue, they say, are jobs, educational equity, adequate housing and healthcare, equal pay, and the continual fight against racism, sexism, and bigotry.

"We will fight against attempts to erase decades of constitutional protections for women and girls," said Women's March Cleveland head organizer Kathy Wray Coleman on the Facebook event page , which also reveals that Cleveland is slated to host one of the largest sister marches in the country the weekend of Jan. 21.

Women's March Cleveland has enlisted a coalition of other activist and women's rights groups of greater Cleveland  for the event, including Ohio Physicians for Reproductive Rights, Laura Cowan Foundation, Red, Wine and Blue, Black Women's PAC of Ohio, Carl Stokes Brigade, Black Women's Army, Greater Cleveland Alliance of Black School Educators, League of Women Voters East Cleveland Chapter, Journey Center for Safety and Healing ( Domestic Violence Center in Cleveland) Cuyahoga Democratic Women's Caucus, Black on Black Crime Inc. and Rise Up 4 Abortion Rights.

A grassroots women's rights group comprised primarily of greater Cleveland activist women and first established in 2017 when thousands of women in Cleveland and millions as a whole in sister cities nationwide marched in the streets in their respective cities following then president Donald Trump's inauguration, one of the largest single day marches in American history, Women's March Cleveland has over 4,600 members and in addition to an anniversary march in January of each years it hosts intermittent marches, many of them sister marches with other cities on women's rights The issues they fight for, practically all of them public policy matters impacting women, also include poverty, excessive force, and the nation's intrinsically racist legal system.

But reproductive rights have also become a central premise of the organization, along with rape, murder and other heinous violence against women in the largely Black major American city of Cleveland, a disproportionate number of the victims Black, Hispanic, and poor.

According to organizers, Saturday's march in Cleveland is also a march against the reinstatement of the heartbeat bill in Ohio, a six week abortion ban and state law that took effect after the U.S. The Supreme Court, on June 24, 2022 overturned Roe v Wade and relegated the authority to restrict or outright outlaw abortion to the respective state legislatures nationwide. The  state law is temporarily on hold per the ruling of a Hamilton County judge and as lawsuits over the measure make their way through the courts.

Women's rights remain under attack in Ohio and elsewhere, Women’s March Cleveland organizers told clevelandurbannews.com and kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio’s Black digital news leader.

“We also call for a ceasefire on murder and other violence against Cleveland and greater Cleveland women that disproportionately impacts Black women and other women of color," Women's March Cleveland organizers said. "We support all women and we believe in inclusion across racial, ethnic, religious, gender, socioeconomic and other lines. We are true grassroots activists and we are not owned by the establishment or government or corporate interests."

clevelandurbannews.com and www.kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.


Last Updated on Saturday, 21 January 2023 06:54

Cleveland, Northeast Ohio women to march on January 21, 2023 in Cleveland for reproductive and Civil Rights and against violence, Women's March Cleveland's 6th anniversary....The rally is at 12:30 pm at Market Square Park across from the Westside Market

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(Photo by David Petkiewicz of cleveland.com).

clevelandurbannews.com and www.kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com

CLEVELAND, Ohio- Women in Cleveland  and Northeast Ohio will take to the streets in Cleveland on Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023  for Women's March Cleveland's sixth-year anniversary and to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Roe Wade, one of several sister marches nationwide the weekend of Jan 21. Rally speakers include elected officials, reproductive rights and anti-violence advocates, educational and voting rights advocates, and Black mothers who have lost loved ones to homicides in Cleveland. (Event contact tel: (216) 659-0473 and Facebook event page)

The event will begin with a 12:30 pm rally at Market Square Park at W. 25th Street and Lorain Avenue in the city's Ohio City neighborhood, and across from the Westside Market near downtown Cleveland. A 1:30pm march will follow. A march that Women's March Cleveland hosted at Market Square Park in October of 2021 for reproductive rights drew roughly 2,500 people and though Saturday's upcoming march will be smaller like other cities nationwide that are also holding sister rallies and marches to celebrate the anniversary of the now defucct Roe v Wade, it will draw a decent crowd, organizers said, and will be one of the largest sister marches nationwide this weekend.

Organizers said that hundreds are expected. The women say that they are marching for reproductive rights and abortion access, voting and Civil Rights, and to seek to eradicate violence against women Also at issue, they say, are jobs, educational equity, adequate housing and healthcare, equal pay, and the continual fight against racism, sexism, and bigotry.

"We will fight against attempts to erase decades of constitutional protections for women and girls," organizers said on the Facebook event page , which also reveals that Cleveland is slated to host one of the largest sister marches in the country the weekend of Jan. 21.

Women's March Cleveland has enlisted a coalition of other activist and women's rights groups of greater Cleveland  for the event, including Ohio Physicians for Reproductive Rights, Laura Cowan Foundation, Red, Wine and Blue, Black Women's PAC of Ohio, Carl Stokes Brigade, Black Women's Army, Greater Cleveland Alliance of Black School Educators, League of Women Voters East Cleveland Chapter, Journey Center for Safety and Healing ( Domestic Violence Center in Cleveland) Cuyahoga Democratic Women's Caucus, Black on Black Crime Inc. and Rise Up 4 Abortion Rights.

A grassroots women's rights group comprised primarily of greater Cleveland activist women and first established in 2017 when thousands of women in Cleveland and millions as a whole in sister cities nationwide marched in the streets in their respective cities following then president Donald Trump's inauguration, one of the largest single day marches in American history, Women's March Cleveland has over 4,600 members and in addition to an anniversary march in January of each years it hosts intermittent marches, many of them sister marches with other cities on women's rights The issues they fight for, practically all of them public policy matters impacting women, also include poverty, excessive force, and the nation's intrinsically racist legal system.

But reproductive rights have also become a central premise of the organization, along with rape, murder and other heinous violence against women in the largely Black major American city of Cleveland, a disproportionate number of the victims Black, Hispanic, and poor.

According to organizers, Saturday's march in Cleveland is also a march against the reinstatement of the heartbeat bill in Ohio, a six week abortion ban and state law that took effect after the U.S. The Supreme Court, on June 24, 2022 overturned Roe v Wade and relegated the authority to restrict or outright outlaw abortion to the respective state legislatures nationwide. The  state law is temporarily on hold per the ruling of a Hamilton County judge and as lawsuits over the measure make their way through the courts.

Women's rights remain under attack in Ohio and elsewhere, Women’s March Cleveland organizers told clevelandurbannews.com and kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio’s Black digital news leader.

“We also call for a ceasefire on murder and other violence against Cleveland and greater Cleveland women that disproportionately impacts Black women and other women of color," Women's March Cleveland organizers said. "We support all women and we believe in inclusion across racial, ethnic, religious, gender, socioeconomic and other lines. We are true grassroots activists and we are not owned by the establishment or government or corporate interests.

clevelandurbannews.com and www.kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.


Last Updated on Saturday, 21 January 2023 06:53

MLK Holiday: Our exclusive interview with Ralph David Abernathy III, a former Georgia state senator and son of the late Ralph David Abernathy Sr.....His father founded SCLC along with Dr. King

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Pictured are Ralph David Abernathy III ) (wearing blue suit), the late Ralph David Abernathy Sr, and the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

By Marc R. Churchill, staff reporter, and Kathy Wray Coleman, editor-in-chief. Coleman is a former public school biology teacher and a seasoned Black political, legal and investigative reporter who trained as a reporter at the Call and Post Newspaper in Cleveland, Ohio for 17 years.
clevelandurbannews.com and www.kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email:
editor@clevelandurbannews.com
THE BELOW ARTICLE INCLUDES ARCHIVES FROM OUR PREVIOUS ONE-ON-ONE INTERVIEW WITH RAPLH DAVID ABERNATHY III

CLEVELAND, Ohio-As Jan 16, 2023 approaches, a national holiday in observance of the late iconic Civil Rights leader the Rev. Dr. .Martin Luther King Jr., we pause to remember the struggles that Blacks in America continue to face as a whole on almost a daily basis, struggles across the continuum that remain in spite of some gains during the Civil Rights Movemenet of the 1950s and 1960s. Had Dr King not been assassinated, it would be his 94th birthday on Jan 15.

The late Ralph David Abernathy III (pictured), whose famed father, the Rev. Ralph David Abernathy Sr., marched along side of the Dr. King during the Civil Rights Movement and led the Southern Christian Leadership Conference after King was assassinated, visited Cleveland, Ohio on Nov. 4, 2012 to stomp for Barack Obama's  reelection  to the presidency and he interviewed one-on-one with clevelandurbannews.com and kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio's most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog

“My father and Uncle Martin [King] were like twins, and they even dressed alike sometimes, and Uncle Martin died in his arms.” said Abernathy III, an evangelist and motivational speaker who grew up in Montgomery, AL. and served a decade in the Georgia State Legislature, first as a state represetative and thereafter as a state senator.

Abernathy III was among a host of famous Blacks that toured Cleveland during the weeks leading up to the Nov 6., 2012 presidential election to rally voters for the Barack Obama campaign in the still pivotal state of Ohio, Cleveland a Democratic stronghold and the largest city in the delegate rich 11th congressional district, also heavily Democratic.

He spoke at a rally at Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church after appearing as a guest on ‘The Art McKoy University Show, ’ which airs weekly from 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm on W.E.R.E. AM radio.

Other prominent Blacks in Cleveland in support of Obama's 2012 reelection bid were John Legend, who is native of Springfield Ohio, Stevie Wonder, Yolanda Adams, Congressional Black Caucus members, California Attorney General Kamala Harris, who later became a U.S. senator and is now the vice president, actress Vivica Fox, and Valerie Jarrett, one of three senior advisers to Obama when he was president

The first Black president of the United States of America and the country's most popular Black Democrat, Obama completed his second term in the White House in 2016 and was succeeded by outgoing president Donald Trump, a Republican real estate mogul elected president in 2016 who lost the 2020 presidential election to  President Joe Biden, who served as vice president under Obama.

Abernathy Sr died in 1990.

His son, Abernathy III,
once imprisoned as a Georgia state senator for theft and forgery relative to his finances while in office died of cancer in 2016, just two days shy of his 57th birthday. He says that his imprisonment was government entrapment becuasehe was so outspoke for Blacks and other disenfranchised people, and allegedly because he had a famous name.

The younger Abernathy believed that too often Blacks forget what other Blacks fought for, and died for, including the right to vote.

“Some people have forgotten what we have fought for all these years," he said.

Jailed at a protest in Montgomery at nine-years- old, Abernathy III was a fighter like his father. His older brother was named after his father too, but died three days after birth.

The fourth of five children, including his deceased brother, the articulate Abernathy lll said that the reason he called King "Uncle Martin" is because the Abernathy and King families were just that close, and that his father and King were, “Civil Rights twins."

He was also nine years old when King was assassinated in 1968 on a hotel balcony in Tennessee, and when his father later assumed the leadership role of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the Civil Rights organization that they founded together that was the thrust of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s.

He said that he often had trouble sleeping as a kid because their home in Montgomery had been bombed and he feared it would happen again.

"For years, I was afraid to go to sleep at night when I was a child because I feared that our house would get bombed," said Abernathy III.

The former Georgia state lawmaker said that while Black people have not been fully compensated for the unconstitutional and statutory wrongs that they have endured as a once enslaved people, times have changed somewhat for the Black community.

Barack Obama, he said during the Nov 4, 2012 one-on-one interview with Marc Churchill and Kathy Wray Coleman of clevelandurbannews.com and kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com is a part  of that systemic change in action and is a change agent for the betterment of Black people in particular, and the American people in general. And he said that the struggle for equal justice and equal opportunity for Black people continues.

“In as much as things seem to change, they still remain the same. There is a transitional period of the Black community and a lack of true economic power," said Abernathy III

clevelandurbannews.com and www.kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Monday, 16 January 2023 19:43

Lisa Marie Presley is dead at 54, Presley the only daughter of rock and roll pioneer Elvis Presley and an ex-wife of Michael Jackson, the late pop music icon

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Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com.

CALABASAS-, California-Lisa Marie Presley, a singer, songwriter and humanitarian and the only daughter of the late rock and roll pioneer Elvis Presley and his wife Priscilla Presley, is dead at 54. The younger Presley was also an ex-wife of the late pop music icon Michael Jackson, and was once married to actor Nicholas Cage.

“It is with a heavy heart that I must share the devastating news that my beautiful daughter Lisa Marie has left us,” Priscilla Presley, 77, said in a statement. “She was the most passionate, strong and loving woman I have ever known.”

Specifics regarding Lisa Marie Presley's death have not been made public other than that paramedics were rushed to her home in Calabasas, Calif., on Thursday morning. She later died at a nearby hospital just 20 days shy of her 55th birthday

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department confirmed to PEOPLE that paramedics responded to the 5900 block of Normandy drive in Calabasas to treat a woman in her 50s who was not breathing. When they arrived, the paramedics began CPR and, upon noting the patient had "signs of life," transferred the woman to a local hospital for "immediate medical care."

Elvis and Priscilla Presley separated in 1972 when their daughter was four years old, and the younger Presley was only nine when her father died in 1977. Married and divorced four times, Lisa Marie Presley leaves behind three children, twins and talented actress Riley Keough, 33, an actress in her own right. A son, Benjamin Keough, Riley Keough's younger brother and whose father was Presley's first husband, musician Danny Keough, preceded his mother in death, dying in 2020 at 27-years old of suicide.

Lisa Marie will buried at Graceland where her father Elvis and son Bejamin Keough are burried

 

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Sunday, 15 January 2023 20:34

Cleveland Mayor Justin Bibb seeks applicants for Civilian Police Review Board vacancy -Applications are due by January 27, 2023

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Pictured is Cleveland Mayor Justin Bibb

January 11, 2023CLEVELAND, Ohio-Cleveland Mayor Justin Bibb, in his second year as mayor of the largely Black urban city, announced Wednesday that the City of Cleveland is looking for a qualified applicant to fill a vacant seat on the Civilian Police Review Board.


The selected applicant would be appointed to complete a four-year term that expires on Feb. 1, 2024. The individual appointed to fill out the current term would also be eligible to apply for the new full four-year term that would begin in February 2024. The candidate for this vacant position must be a resident of the City of Cleveland at the time of appointment.


To apply, submit a resume with work history and a cover letter to Ryan Puente, Deputy Chief of Staff & Chief Government Affairs Officer, at rpuente@clevelandohio.gov by Friday, January 27, 2023. Compensation is$8,963 annually.


The Civilian Police Review Board (CPRB) is comprised of nine members per the city charter, five of whom are chosen by the mayor and four by the 17-member city council It has the authority to receive, cause investigation of, and recommend resolution of non-criminal complaints filed with it alleging misconduct by officers and non-sworn employees of the Cleveland Division of Police when such alleged misconduct is directed toward any person who is not a CDP employee.


Investigations of alleged police misconduct are conducted by the Office of Professional Standards (OPS). The OPS reports directly to the CPRB, and the CPRB reviews the investigations completed by the OPS. Following an OPS investigation, the CPRB holds a public hearing and recommends an administrative resolution for each of the complaints. Applicants are encouraged to review City of Cleveland Charter Section 115, which governs the CPRB and OPS and which was significantly reformed following the passage of Issue 24 in 2021.


Members of the CPRB have a unique role as public servants with respect to reviewing the conduct of Division of Police employees. The community, government, and law enforcement have entrusted members of the CPRB to conduct their work in a professional, fair, and impartial manner. This trust is earned through individual members of the CPRB having a firm commitment to the public good, the mission of the CPRB, and the exercise of high ethical and professional standards. The work itself requires a keen focus on detail, a strict adherence to the governing rules, and a willingness to attend every meeting having fully reviewed every case.


Requirements: Persons applying to fill a position on the CPRB cannot be employed currently as a law enforcement officer and cannot be a current or former employee of the Cleveland Division of Police. Also, such persons cannot be a current employed by the City of Cleveland or by any public agency having a connection with the City of Cleveland, including county agencies and community development corporations.


The City of Cleveland charter now requires that two members of the CPRB "should be attorneys with experience representing victims of police misconduct or criminally prosecuting police misconduct."

 

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Thursday, 12 January 2023 00:09

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Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 11 January 2023 19:43

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The annual11th Congressional District Caucus Parade is Monday, September 2

11th Congressional District Congresswoman Marcia L. Fudge, a Warrensville Heights Democrat who also chairs the Congressional Black Caucus of Blacks in Congress. waives to the crowd last year at the annual 11th Congressional District Caucus Parade.  This year's parade kicks off on Monday, September 2 on Cleveland's east side at 10:00 am from E. 149th Street and Kinsman Road and ends at Luke Easter Park where the picnic will begin. The event will be replete with political speeches and entertainment from various sources, including local musicians and bands. The well-attended caucus parade was initiated by Democrat Louis Stokes, the retired congressman before Fudge, and the tradition was furthered by the late Democratic Congresswoman Stephanie Tubbs Jones, Fudges' predecessor. Stokes was the first Black congressperson from Ohio and Tubbs Jones was the first Black congresswoman from Ohio