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WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S RALLY AGAINST THE SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V. WADE

BELOW PICTURE: Women's March Cleveland Head Organizer Kathy Wray Coleman (2nd from left) leads 2,500 people in a march for reproductive rights on Oct 2, 2021 on Market Square in Cleveland, Ohio. It was one of the largest marches in the country that day. Photo and coverage by the Plain Dealer and Cleveland.com. CLICK HERE TO GO GO TO CLEVELAND.COM TO READ ON THE COVERAGE OF THE EVENT

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BELOW PICTURE AND UPDATE:

SATURDAY, JUNE 11, 2022-NOON-2PM

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS  TO BE ANNOUNCED

EVENT CONTACT TEL: WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND (216) 659-0473

Women's March Cleveland's Save Roe Rally & March for Civil

Rights and against the U.S. Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade

is Sat., June 11, 2022, noon- 2pm, City Hall steps in

Cleveland, Ohio, 600 Lakeside Avenue E  44114

CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE FACEBOOK EVENT PAGE FOR WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S RALLY & MARCH AGAINST THE U.S. SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V. WADE

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S RALLY & MARCH AGAINST THE U.S. SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V WADE AT MOBILIZEUS.COM




Comedian Chris Rock to bring his "Ego Death" world tour to Cleveland at Playhouse Square following Will Smith's Oscars slap....Rock added a second show in Cleveland after the Oscar slap....By editor Kathy Wray Coleman of Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathyw

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clevelandurbannews.com and www.kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com

CLEVELAND, Ohio - Comedian and actor Chris Rock (pictured), whom Oscar winner Will Smith slapped during Sunday's Oscars ceremony for a joke about his wife Jada Pinket Smith's hair loss, is bringing his “Ego Death” world tour to Playhouse Square in downtown Cleveland for a performances on June 16-17 at the Connor Palace.

Rock's upcoming shows follows comedian and actor Dave Chapelle, who performed in Cleveland at Playhouse Square on Feb 19, the weekend of the NBA All-Star Game that Cleveland hosted.

Tickets went on sale on Friday, Feb. 25 on Ticketmaster’s website for the June 16 show and tickets for the Judge 17 show will go on sale Friday, April 1. The second show on June 16 was added after the Oscars fiasco.

A three-time Grammy winner and four-time Emmy winner, Rock, 57, has not toured in nearly five years. Rock came to prominence as a cast member of Saturday Night Live in the early 1990s. He went on to more prominent film appearances, with starring roles in Down to Earth (2001), Head of State (2003), The Longest Yard (2005), the Madagascar film series (2005–2012), Grown Ups (2010), its sequel Grown Ups 2 (2013), Top Five (2014), and a series of acclaimed stand-up specials for HBO. He developed, wrote, and narrated the sitcom Everybody Hates Chris (2005–2009), which was based on his early life. In 2020, he starred in the fourth season of the FX black comedycrime drama anthology series Fargo.

Rock hosted the Academy Awards twice, in 2005 and in 2016. He has won four Emmy Awards and three Grammy Awards. He was voted the fifth-greatest stand-up comedian in a poll conducted by Comedy Central. He was also voted in the United Kingdom as the ninth-greatest stand-up comic on Channel 4's 100 Greatest Stand-Ups in 2007, and again in the updated 2010 list as the eighth-greatest stand-up comic.

clevelandurbannews.com and www.kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Thursday, 31 March 2022 16:40

Ohio Supreme Court Justices Brunner and Stewart, others attend ceremony in Cleveland for retired judge Patrica Ann Blackmon that was held by the Black Women's PAC of greater Cleveland

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Pictured is retired Ohio 8th District Court of Appeals Judge Patricia Ann Blackmon
By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor-in-chief

CLEVELAND, Ohio- The Black Women's Political  Action Committee of greater Cleveland, which is led by Elaine Gohlstin, honored retired Ohio 8th District Court of Appeals Judge Patricia Ann Blackmon during a special open-to-the-public ceremony on Thurs,. March 24, 2022 at Karamu House Theatre on Cleveland's largely Black east side.

Among other community members, a wealth of judges, at least 20 of them, attended in their robes from Cleveland Municipal Court judges, to Cuyahoga County common pleas and 8th District Court of Appeals judges and Ohio Supreme Court Justices Melody Stewart and Jennifer Brunner. Brunner is a Democrat running this year against Republican Justice Sharon Kennedy in hopes of replacing retiring Chief Justice Maureen O'Connor, a Republican and the first woman elected chief justice of Ohio's highest court by Ohio voters. (Editor's note: Chief municipal and common pleas judges in Ohio are elected by their judicial peers while the chief justice of the seven-member, largely Republican Ohio Supreme Court is elected by voters rather than by a collective vote of the judges on the bench at the time).

Other influential judges there include Cleveland Municipal  Housing Court Judge W. Mona Scott, Cleveland Judges Sheila Turner McCall, Andrea Nelson Moore, and Jazmine Torres- Lugo, county juvenile court Judge Michael J. Ryan, common pleas judges Breendan Sheehan (chief judge), Richard Bell, Cassandra Collier Williams, Shirley Strickland Saffold, Joan Synenberg, Wanda C. Jones, Deborah M. Turner, and Sherrie Miday,  county domestic court relations judges Tonya R.  Jones and Francine Goldberg, and 8th District Court of Appeals Judge Lisa A. Forbes and Michelle Sheehan (Editor's note: Most but not all of the judges who were in attendance are named herein)

Retired Cleveland judge Mable Jasmer, and retired East Cleveland Judge Una H.R. Keenon, who is also president of the East Cleveland Board of Education, also came out to support Judge Blackmon.

Richmond Heights Mayor Kim Thomas, state school board member Meryl Tobert Johnson, and County Council persons Cheryl Stephens and Meredith Turner were among other dignitaries there. Stephens if also a lieutenant governor candidate who is running on the Democratic ticket of gubernatorial candidate Nan Whaley, a fomer mayor of Dayton.

The event comes as Women's History Month, which is celebrated annually in March in the United States, comes to a close.

Gohlsin, who succeeded Una Keenon in leading the PAC, said that her group is "a group of women who support and raise money for women to win political races in Ohio, particularly Black women."

Former 11th congressional district congresswoman Marcia L Fudge, now the secretary of housing and urban development with the President Joe Biden administration, and former Cleveland mayor Frank Jackson, who retired last year after four terms in office, saluted Blackmon via videos of their presentations that were presented to the audience.

Blackmon spoke and thanked the PAC and others there, and said that she was fortunate to have a distinguished career in law and then as a city prosecutor and a state appeals court judge.

A founding member of the Black Women's PAC like Kennon and a few other Black women, Judge Blackmon, along with since retired 8th district court of appeals judge Sara J. Harper, is the first African American woman elected as a judge on a state court of appeals in Ohio. They both were first elected to the appellate bench in Cuyahoga County, which includes Cleveland, the same year.

She was elected on her first try, and she and Harper, also a PAC sisterare amoing the women who paved the way for Democratic Ohio Supreme Court Justice Melody Stewart, the first Black and first Black woman elected to the state's highest court and a former 8th district court of appeals judge like Blackmon and Harper, a Black Republican.

Judge Blackmon served five judicial terms before retiring in February of 2021, having been term limited due to age since, per state law, Ohio judges cannot run for a judgeship if they are 70 or older, though they can serve out the remainder of a term where applicable.

Born in Mississippi, Judge Blackmon graduated from Tougaloo College magna cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in African-American studies, political science, and history. She was recruited to attend Cleveland-Marshall College of Law by the late judge Ann Aldrich and received her law degree in 1975.

With Cleveland as her new home, she was a practicing attorney and later served as chief prosecutor for the city of Cleveland and the city’s first night prosecutor. She also served as an assistant director of Victims/Witness Program and taught classes at Dyke College.

During her career Judge Blackmon was described by her peers, and others, as a "brilliant chief city prosecutor-turned brilliant appellate court judge."

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor. Coleman is a seasoned Black Cleveland journalist who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper for 17 years and an experienced investigative and political reporter. She is the most read independent journalist in Ohio per Alexa.com

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.


Last Updated on Wednesday, 30 March 2022 13:08

Democratic U.S. Senate debate held in Ohio between candidates Tim Ryan, Morgan Harper and Traci Johnson as the May 3, 2022 primary nears, a debate held at Central State University, an HBCU....Watch the debate here

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Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com

WILBERFORCE, Ohio-U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan, attorney Morgan Harper and tech executive Traci Johnson debated at Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio on Mon. March 28, an  event occurring just weeks before the May 3 primary election and likely the only Democratic debate between those vying for the Democratic nomination in the race to U.S Sen. Rob Portman, who is retiring.

Central State University is a historically Black university in Ohio. While Ryan,  a former presidential candidate who is not seeking reelection to Congress, is White, both Harper and Johnson are Black women, and both are community activists.

Seven Republicans running for the GOP nomination, most of them millionaires, will debate at Central State University Monday night.

Here is a video of  Monday's 55 min. debate between Ryan, Harper and Johnson

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 29 March 2022 19:52

Women's History Month comes to a close.....How did it begin in the United States?

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CLEVELAND,Ohio-Women's History Month, which comes to a close on March 31, is an annual declared month that highlights the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society. It is celebrated during March in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia, corresponding with International Women's Day on March 8, and during October in Canada, corresponding with the celebration of Persons Day on October 18.

The commemoration began in 1978 as "Women's History day" in Sonoma County, California, and was championed by Gerda Lerner and the National Women's History Alliance to be recognized as a national week (1980) and then month (1987) in the United States, spreading internationally after that.


In the United States, Women's History Month traces its beginnings back to the first International Women's Day in 1911. In 1978, the school district of Sonoma, California participated in Women's History Week, an event designed around the week of March 8 (International Women's Day). In 1979, a fifteen-day conference about women's history was held at Sarah Lawrence College from July 13 until July 29, chaired by historian Gerda Lerner. It was co-sponsored by Sarah Lawrence College, the Women's Action Alliance, and the Smithsonian Institution.

When its participants learned about the success of the Sonoma County's Women's History Week celebration, they decided to initiate similar celebrations within their own organizations, communities, and school districts. They also agreed to support an effort to secure a National Women's History Week.

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com , the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Monday, 28 March 2022 16:35

Services for activist Hattie 'Mama' Porter of Cleveland are March 27, 2022....Porter is the mother of activist Alfred Porter Jr., president of Black on Black Crime Inc.

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Pictured are Hattie "Mama" Porter and her son, activist Alfred Porter Jr, president of Black on Black Crime Inc Her son's picture is shown in the expended view of this post an in latest news by clicking on the title of this article
By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor-in-chief
Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com CLEVELAND. Ohio- Services will be held for community activist and advocate Hattie "Mama" Porter, who died on March 3 in hospice care, on Sun., March 27 at  Coventry Peace Campus Church, 2843 Washington Blvd. in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, a Cleveland suburb.

Visitation begins at 1pm and will be followed by a service at 2:30pm. Pastor Tamar Gray, who leads the church, will officiate and deliver the eulogy.

Porter was 85-years-old.

Services are entrusted to Gaines Funeral Home in Cleveland.

"Mama Porter," as Porter was called by people who loved her and fondly knew her, was an icon among grassroots community activists in the Cleveland area  She was the mother of community activist Alfred Porter Jr. , president of Black on Black Crime Inc and a community organizer. She earned the title "Mama Porter" not only because of her activism around voting rights and on the frontlines during excessive force and women's rights and other community protests, but also due to her wisdom on an array of issues and her dedication to the church, her family, and the community.

With Alfred as her only child and as a single parent struggling to make ends meet, she was an active parent during the Cleveland schools desegregation era of the 1980s and 1990s, and she fought for Black children. She was a former chair of the School Community Council (SCC), a parental involvement and watch-dog organization mandated by then U.S. District Court Judge Frank J. Battisti under the now defunct desegregation court order in Reed v Rhodes, the longstanding schools desegregation case that ended in 1998 and was substituted with mayoral control of Cleveland's public school district. And in that role with the SCC she worked with the late Dr. James M. Coleman, then an assistant superintendent and a member of the Cleveland schools desegregation team, never hesitating to stand up for parents and Black children when others sought to violate the remedial provisions of the court order.

Mama Porter was born on July 4, 1936 to the late Calvin Boyd Sr. and Lucille Boyd in the deep south in Pickensville, Alabama, which is divided by the Tom Bigby River and shares its western border with the Mississippi state line. She had three siblings, Calvin Boyd, Jr., Paula Maxine Dupree Boyd, and Willie Anne Garrett, all of whom preceded her in death. She was raised in the small town of Pickensville, which at that time had about 150 residents.

After graduating from high school she attended Morris Brown College in Atlanta Georgia and later worked at Lincoln University. She married and relocated to Chicago, Illinois as part of the Great Migration when more than six million African Americans from rural towns like Pickensville moved to large Northern states in urban areas in the hope of finding jobs and a better life.

Fleeing domestic violence, Mama Porter left Chicago and she and son Alfred moved to Cleveland in 1970, and Cleveland became their longtime home. She was employed by the Cleveland Metropolitan School District as an office assistant and later worked for the United Way.  She was a tireless advocate for civil and human rights, not only as a parent deeply involved during the Cleveland schools desegregation period but throughout her adult life, and until illness slowed her down.

In addition to her son Alfred Porter Jr, Mama Porter will be missed by so many, including her nephew, Donald Depree Jr., cousins Ann Barclay, Scottie Barclay, Bill Barclay, and Bonnie Barclay, community activists, members of the church congregation at Grace Communion Church in Cleveland where she is a member, and a host of friends and associates.

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor. Coleman is a seasoned Black Cleveland journalist who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper for 17 years and an experienced investigative and political reporter. She is the most read independent journalist in Ohio per Alexa.com

 

Last Updated on Saturday, 26 March 2022 01:25

Madeleine Albright, first woman to serve as U.S. secretary of state, has died.....Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio's Black digital news leader

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Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com

Madeleine Jana Korbel Albright an American diplomat and civil and human rights advocate who served as the 64th United States Secretary of State from 1997 to 2001 under President Bill Clinton and the first female secretary of state in U.S. history, died Wednesday after a brave battle with cancer. She was 84.

President Joe Biden called Albright a legend and said that she was a fighter for liberty and justice, and that she spent her entire political life "defending freedom around the world and lifting up those who suffered under repression."

Former president Clinton also commented and described Albright, also a women's rights proponent, as one of the best in her role as secretary of state, and "a passionate force for freedom, democracy and human rights."

A Democrat, Albright immigrated with her family to the United States in 1948 from Czechoslovakia. Her father, diplomat Josef Korbel, settled the family in DenverColorado, and she became a U.S. citizen in 1957. Albright graduated from Wellesley College in 1959 and earned a PhD from Columbia University in 1975, writing her thesis on the Prague Spring. She worked as an aide to Senator Edmund Muskie before taking a position under Zbigniew Brzezinski on the National Security Council. She served in that position until 1981, when President Jimmy Carter left office.

After leaving the National Security Council, Albright joined the academic faculty of Georgetown University and advised Democratic candidates regarding foreign policy. After Clinton's victory in the 1992 presidential election, Albright helped assemble his National Security Council. In 1993, Clinton appointed her to the position of U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. She held that position until 1997, when she became Secretary of State. Albright served in that capacity until Clinton left office in 2001.

Albright served as chair of the Albright Stonebridge Group, a consulting firm, and was the Michael and Virginia Mortara Endowed Distinguished Professor in the Practice of Diplomacy at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service. In May 2012, she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by U.S. President Barack Obama. Albright served on the board of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Albright married Joseph Medill Patterson Albright in 1959. The couple had three daughters before divorcing in 1982. (Wikipedia references

 

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.
Last Updated on Friday, 25 March 2022 23:42

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The annual11th Congressional District Caucus Parade is Monday, September 2

11th Congressional District Congresswoman Marcia L. Fudge, a Warrensville Heights Democrat who also chairs the Congressional Black Caucus of Blacks in Congress. waives to the crowd last year at the annual 11th Congressional District Caucus Parade.  This year's parade kicks off on Monday, September 2 on Cleveland's east side at 10:00 am from E. 149th Street and Kinsman Road and ends at Luke Easter Park where the picnic will begin. The event will be replete with political speeches and entertainment from various sources, including local musicians and bands. The well-attended caucus parade was initiated by Democrat Louis Stokes, the retired congressman before Fudge, and the tradition was furthered by the late Democratic Congresswoman Stephanie Tubbs Jones, Fudges' predecessor. Stokes was the first Black congressperson from Ohio and Tubbs Jones was the first Black congresswoman from Ohio