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Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio's leader in Black digital news

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Ohio Congresswoman Emilia Sykes denounces new House speaker as against abortion, social security, medicaid and medicare.....By Clevelandurbannews.com, Ohio's Black digital news leader

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Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Rep. Emilia Sykes (OH-13), an Akron Democrat and one of three Black women in congress from Ohio, denounced House Republicans' choice on Wednesday of Rep. Mike Johnson (LA-04) as the new speaker of the House.


After weeks of political infighting and a House of Representatives that has been at a standstill since congressional Republicans ousted then House Speaker Kevin McCarthy earlier this month, Johnson won with unanimous support from fellow Republican lawmakers over House Minority Leader Rep. Hakeen Jefferies, 220-209. His win, however, came steeped in controversy and claims by naysayers that he is  a 2020 election denier and radial right extremist who is staunchly against women's reproductive rights and medicare and medicaid for the nation's seniors and marginalized groups, among a host of other public policy issues dear to Democrats.


“I’m disappointed that after three weeks of House Republicans fighting among-st  themselves and forcing congress to a standstill as they have chosen to elect an extreme House speaker that supported efforts to overturn the 2020 election, wants to criminalize abortion nationwide, and has worked to slash social security, medicare, and medicaid,” Sykes said. “People in Ohio’s 13th congressional district deserve a speaker of the House who will work together with any member to find common ground and bipartisan solutions— not someone who will double down on partisan politics meant to distract and divide us."

The congresswoman went on to say that " I hope my colleagues on the other side of the aisle are ready to put people over politics and do the same.”


Republicans hold a slim majority in the House and Democrats narrowly control the Senate.

 

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interviewCLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Thursday, 26 October 2023 02:29

Ohio Congresswoman Shontel Brown announces $153 million in home energy funding from congress for Ohioans, including Clevelanders.... "No Ohio family should be cold this winter, or have to choose between paying for heat and buying groceries," Brown said

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Washington, DC – Ohio Congresswoman Shontel Brown (OH-11) on Tuesday announced that Ohio has been awarded $153.6 million in funding for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)rom the federal government as some Clevelanders in the largely Black urban  city  deal with high energy bills and heightened poverty during a still existing global pandemic.


"No Ohio family should be cold this winter, or have to choose between paying for heat and buying groceries," said Rep. Brown, a Warrensville Hts Democrat and one of three Black women in congress from Ohio. "That's why I've continued to support the LIHEAP program and part of why it was so important to keep the government open. Thanks to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this key program receives additional funding to help meet increased needs."


The congresswoman went on to say that "I encourage my constituents who need help with heating bills to visit energyhelp.us or contact my office – we can help you apply,"


Administered through the Administration for Children and Families' Office of Community Services at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, LIHEAP funding will help households with low incomes pay their energy bills. LIHEAP can also be used to weatherize and make residences more energy efficient.


Rep. brown's funding release was made possible by two measures voted for by Congresswoman Brown. The largest portion comes from funds appropriated by Congress in the Continuing Appropriations Act of 2024, passed last month. Additional funding for LIHEAP is from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, which Congresswoman Brown voted for in 2021.

LIHEAP is federally funded and delivered through the states, including Ohio's HEAP Program.


Rep. Brown's funding announcement includes $153,657,915 total for Ohio:

  • $149,159,774 for Ohio from the regular LIHEAP block grant funding
  • $4,498,141 additional funding for Ohio from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law

LIHEAP Funding Announcement and link to state tables here. HHS release here.

Individuals interested in applying for LIHEAP or learning more about eligibility can visit energyhelp.us or call the National Energy Assistance Referral (NEAR) toll-free at: 1-866-674-6327.


Energy burden is defined as the percentage of gross household income spent on energy costs. According to DOE's Low-Income Energy Affordability Data (LEAD) Tool, the national average energy burden for low-income households is 8.6 percent, three times higher than for non-low-income households, which is estimated at three percent.


Last Updated on Thursday, 02 November 2023 15:49

Mayor Bibb comments on Cleveland's new digital parking smart app that eliminates parking meters and introduces smart parking to Cleveland ...By clevelandurbannews.com, Ohio's black digital news leader

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Cleveland Mayor Justin Bibb

CLEVELAND, Ohio-The City of Cleveland, in collaboration with ParkMobile, has officially launched a new digital parking solution in downtown Cleveland, in what city officials say is an effort to revolutionize the parking experience for both residents and guests of the largely Black major American city.


This launch will phase out approximately 2,500 coin-based parking meters, which will transition into the uniform ParkMobile app-based parking system. The transition is also aligned with Mayor Justin Bibb’s vision to modernize operations throughout the City of Cleveland - improving efficiency and enforcement.


"We are thrilled to partner with ParkMobile to introduce this advanced technology and provide both residents and visitors with a much-improved parking experience in our city, said Mayor Bibb, 36, "the city's fourth Black mayor, its second youngest, and an obviously p[progressive mayor.

With this new system, users can digitally pay for parking by entering the zone number posted nearby directly into the ParkMobile app or their mobile web browser. Non-smartphone users can also utilize ParkMobile by calling their interactive voice response service.

Additionally, users can extend their parking period through the app, providing more time to enjoy the restaurants, events, stores, and amenities downtown. This extended stay option aims to boost revenue for Cleveland business owners and operators, the mayor says..

David Hoyt, managing  director of ParkMobile, said that the company is considered reliable.


"ParkMobile is the trusted parking and mobility management platform for more than 600 cities across North America," said Hoyt. By eliminating the stress of parking in urban environments, we're working towards our mission of making cities more livable."

To learn more about how to use the ParkMobile app and to discover convenient parking locations, visit
https://park.parkmobile.io/oh/cleveland/cleveland-ohio.


About ParkMobile

ParkMobile, LLC is the leading provider of smart parking and mobility solutions in North America and part of the global parking tech company,EasyPark Group.


With the vision to make cities more livable, EasyPark Group owns and develops the apps EasyPark, ParkMobile, RingGo and Park-line, and operates in over 4,000 cities across more than 20 countries. ParkMobile offers digital solutions to quickly find and pay for on-street and off-street parking via a mobile device. The company also offers parking reservations at stadiums, venues, and metro area garages.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 24 October 2023 20:39

Breaking news: Women's March Cleveland thanks Obama for endorsing Ohio State Issue 1, the abortion ballot issue that is on the ballot on Nov 7 in Ohio....Women's March Cleveland comments...By Clevelandurbannews.com, Ohio's Black digital news leader

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CLEVELAND, Ohio - Former President Barack Obama (pictured), the nation's first Black president and a former U.S. senator,  urged  Ohioans on social media late Thursday afternoon to vote for Issue 1, the proposed abortion rights constitutional amendment on the Nov 7 ballot that would legalize abortion in Ohio, a pivotal state for presidential elections that Obama won in 2008 and again for reelection in 2012

Early voting is currently underway.

“Ohio, there’s an important election happening right now,” the former Democratic president  said on X, formerly known as Twitter. “If you want to protect abortion rights by making them part of your state Constitution, vote yes on Issue 1.”

Women's March Cleveland, a greater Cleveland grassroots activist group for women founded in 2017, was elated, saying Obama, a former constitutional lawyer, has been a longtime advocate for women's rights and Civil Rights.

" We thank former president Barack Obama for supporting issue 1 in Ohio as we prepare for victory on Nov 7 when Ohioans vote on whether to enshrine the legal right to abortion into the Ohio constitution,"said longtime Cleveland activist and organizer Kathy Wray Coleman, head organizer for Women's March Cleveland and a long time local Black journalist who interviewed Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president in Cleveland in 2008, a cover story for the Call and Post, Ohio's most prominent Black print newspaper.

Women's March Cleveland is a grassroots women's rights group comprised primarily of greater Cleveland activist women and first established in 2017 when thousands of women in Cleveland and millions as a whole in sister cities nationwide marched in the streets in their respective cities following then president Donald Trump's inauguration, the largest single day march in American history.

The group has over 4,800 members, organizers said. The issues the group fights for or against, practically all of them public policy matters impacting women, also include poverty, excessive force, educational equity for poor and Black children, and the nation's intrinsically racist and sexist legal system.

But reproductive rights have also become a central premise of the organization, along with rape, murder and other heinous violence against women in the largely Black major American city of Cleveland, a disproportionate number of the victims Black, and poor.

If Ohio voters approve issue 1 at the ballot box early next month as polls predict, it would negate a six week abortion ban dubbed "The Heartbeat Bill," a state law that took effect after the U.S. Supreme Court, on June 24, 2022, overturned Roe v Wade and relegated the authority to restrict or outright outlaw abortion aside from applicable federal law to the respective state legislatures nationwide. And those state legislatures are predominantly Republican, including in Ohio.

The  Heartbeat Bill, however, is temporarily on hold per the ruling of a Hamilton County judge and as lawsuits over the controversial measure make their way through the courts.

Last Updated on Sunday, 22 October 2023 16:00

Women's March Cleveland thanks Obama for endorsing Ohio State Issue 1, the abortion ballot issue that is on the ballot on Nov 7 in Ohio....Women's March Cleveland comments...By Clevelandurbannews.com, Ohio's Black digital news leader

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CLEVELAND, Ohio - Former President Barack Obama, the nation's first Black president and a former U.S. senator,  urged  Ohioans on social media late Thursday afternoon to vote for Issue 1, the proposed abortion rights constitutional amendment on the Nov 7 ballot that would legalize abortion in Ohio, a pivotal state for presidential elections that Obama won in 2008 and again for reelection in 2012

Early voting is currently underway.

“Ohio, there’s an important election happening right now,” the former Democratic president  said on X, formerly known as Twitter. “If you want to protect abortion rights by making them part of your state Constitution, vote yes on Issue 1.”

Women's March Cleveland, a greater Cleveland grassroots activist group for women founded in 2017, was elated, saying Obama has been a long time advocate for women's rights and Civil Rights.

" We thank former president Barack Obama for supporting issue 1 in Ohio as we prepare for victory on Nov 7 when Ohioans vote on whether to enshrine the legal right to abortion into the Ohio constitution, said longtime Cleveland activist Kathy wray Coleman, head organizer for Women's March cleveland and a long time local Black journalist who interviewed Obama one-on-one when he was running for president in 2008,  a cover story for the Call and Post, Ohio's most prominent Black print newspaper.

A grassroots women's rights group comprised primarily of greater Cleveland activist women and first established in 2017 when thousands of women in Cleveland and millions as a whole in sister cities nationwide marched in the streets in their respective cities following then president Donald Trump's inauguration, the largest single day march in American history.

Women's March Cleveland has over 4,800 members. The issues the group fights for, practically all of them public policy matters impacting women, also include poverty, excessive force, and the nation's intrinsically racist legal system.

But reproductive rights have also become a central premise of the organization, along with rape, murder and other heinous violence against women in the largely Black major American city of Cleveland, a disproportionate number of the victims Black, and poor.

If Ohio voters approve issue 1 at the ballot box early next month as polls predict, it would negate a six week abortion ban dubbed "The Heartbeat Bill," a state law that took effect after the U.S. The Supreme Court, on June 24, 2022 overturned Roe v Wade and relegated the authority to restrict or outright outlaw abortion aside from applicably federal law to the respective state legislatures nationwide.

The  heart beat bill, however, is temporarily on hold per the ruling of a Hamilton County judge and as lawsuits over the controversial measure make their way through the courts.

Last Updated on Saturday, 28 October 2023 07:09

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