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WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S RALLY AGAINST THE SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V. WADE

BELOW PICTURE: Women's March Cleveland Head Organizer Kathy Wray Coleman (2nd from left) leads 2,500 people in a march for reproductive rights on Oct 2, 2021 on Market Square in Cleveland, Ohio. It was one of the largest marches in the country that day. Photo and coverage by the Plain Dealer and Cleveland.com. CLICK HERE TO GO GO TO CLEVELAND.COM TO READ ON THE COVERAGE OF THE EVENT

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BELOW PICTURE AND UPDATE:

SATURDAY, JUNE 11, 2022-NOON-2PM

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS  TO BE ANNOUNCED

EVENT CONTACT TEL: WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND (216) 659-0473

Women's March Cleveland's Save Roe Rally & March for Civil

Rights and against the U.S. Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade

is Sat., June 11, 2022, noon- 2pm, City Hall steps in

Cleveland, Ohio, 600 Lakeside Avenue E  44114

CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE FACEBOOK EVENT PAGE FOR WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S RALLY & MARCH AGAINST THE U.S. SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V. WADE

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S RALLY & MARCH AGAINST THE U.S. SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V WADE AT MOBILIZEUS.COM




Supreme Court pick Ketanji Brown Jackson rejects GOP attack on her record: ‘Nothing could be further from the truth," the judge said.... Judge Brown Jackson is the first Black woman nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court

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Pictured is Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson,  the first Black woman nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court

WASHINGTON, D.C.-Supreme Court pick Ketanji Brown Jackson has rejected frivolous GOP attacks on her record and said during testimony at a U.S. Senate hearing this week on her nomination that  "nothing could be further from the truth." Below is a synopsis from U.S. Senate hearings, which are ongoing for now, on her nomination to the Supreme Court, Jackson Brown the first Black woman nominated to the nation's highest court

  • -President Joe Biden’s Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson answered senators’ questions about her record and judicial philosophy during the second day of her confirmation hearings.
  • -Jackson told senators a day earlier that she looks at her cases “from a neutral posture” and applies the law “without fear or favor.”
  • -The hearing marks the first time lawmakers will be able to directly cross-examine Jackson under oath in a public forum since she was nominated to the Supreme Court. The federal judge previously met privately with senators on Capitol Hill.
  • -Jackson, a 51-year-old judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, if confirmed would become the first Black woman to sit on the U.S. high court.
  • CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE AT CNBC.COM

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Friday, 08 April 2022 00:07

Black Women's PAC to honor retired judge Patricia Ann Blackmon of Cleveland, Blackmon one of two Black women who were the first Black women to be elected to a state appellate court in Ohio....By editor Kathy Wray Coleman of Clevelandurbannews.com

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Pictured is retired Ohio 8th District court of Appeals judge Patricia Ann Blackmon

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com -By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor-in-chief-CLEVELAND, Ohio- The Black Women's Political  Action Committee of greater Cleveland, which is led by Elaine Gohlstin, who succeeded retired East Cleveland Municipal Court Judge Una H.R. Kennon as president of the Black women's political organization, will honor retired Ohio 8th District Court of Appeals Judge Patricia Ann Blackmon during a special open-to-the-public ceremony on Thurs,. March 24, 2022 at Karamu House Theater on Cleveland's largely Black east side. Doors will open at 5:30pm and the ceremony will begin at 6pm. Judges who attend are asked to wear their robes.

The event comes as Women's History Month, which is celebrated annually in March in the United States, comes to a close.

A founding member of the Black Women's PAC like Judge Kennon, Judge Blackmon, along with since retired 8th district court of appeals judge Sara J, Harper, is the first African American woman elected as a judge on a state court of appeals in Ohio. They both were first elected to the appellate bench in Cuyahoga County, which includes Cleveland, the same year.

She was elected on her first try, and she and Harper, among other Black women, paved the way for Ohio Supreme Court Justice Melody Stewart, the first Black and first Black woman elected to the state's highest court and a former 8th district court of appeals judge like Blackmon and Harper.

Judge Blackmon served five judicial terms before retiring in February of 2021, having been term limited due to age since, per state law, Ohio judges cannot run for a judgeship if they are 70 or older, though they can serve out the remainder of a term where applicable.

Born in Mississippi, Judge Blackmon graduated from Tougaloo College magna cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in African-American studies, political science, and history. She was recruited to attend Cleveland-Marshall College of Law by the late judge Ann Aldrich and received her law degree in 1975.

With Cleveland as her new home, she was a practicing attorney and later served as chief prosecutor for the city of Cleveland and the city’s first night prosecutor. She also served as an assistant director of Victims/Witness Program and and taught classes at Dyke College.

During her career Judge Blackmon was described by her peers, and others, as a "brilliant chief city prosecutor-turned brilliant appellate court judge."

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor. Coleman is a seasoned Black Cleveland journalist who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper for 17 years and an experienced investigative and political reporter. She is the most read independent journalist in Ohio per Alexa.com

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com , the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 30 March 2022 02:43

International Women's Day March Cleveland was March 8, 2022 with keynote speakers Morgan Harper, Cuyahoga County Councilwoman Cheryl Stephens, and activist Cheryl Lessin.... Head organizer Kathy Wray Coleman led the march.....By Clevelandurbannews.com

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Pictured from left: 2020 International Women's Day March Cleveland keynote speakers U.S. Senate candidate Morgan Harper, Cuyahoga County Councilwoman Cheryl Stephens, a former Cleveland Heights mayor and the lieutenant governor candidate on the gubernatorial ticket of former Democratic Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, and activist Cheryl Lessin, and International Women's Day March Cleveland head organizer and activist Kathy Wray Coleman

CLEVELAND, Ohio-Led by Cleveland activist and head organizer Kathy Wray Coleman, who also leads Women's March Cleveland and the Imperial Women Coalition, greater Cleveland women and their supporters rallied and marched on Tues, March 8 to celebrate International Women Day, a 6th annual event that was held on Market Square in the Ohio City neighborhood across from the Westside Market. Keynote speakers were Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Morgan Harper, a Columbus-based attorney and progressive activist who worked under then D.C. consumer watch dog Richard Cordray when Barack Obama was president, Cuyahoga County Councilwoman Cheryl Stephens, a former Cleveland Heights Mayor and the lieutenant governor candidate on the gubernatorial ticket of former Democratic Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, and activist Cheryl Lessin of Refusefacism and Rise Up for Abortion Rights

The theme of this year's march in Cleveland, and internationally, was #Stand Against Bias.

Last year's keynote speakers for the rally in Cleveland were Whaley and state Rep. Emilia Sykes, who is a former minority leader in the Ohio House of Representatives out of Akron who is running for Congress this year in Ohio's 13th congressional district. Ohio 11th Congressional District  Congresswoman Shontel Brown,  then a candidate for the seat in a crowded primary that includes former Ohio senator Nina Turner, was also among the speakers last year.

"We are pleased to have had two Black women, one a superior candidate for the U.S. Senate in Morgan Harper, and the other a worthy lieutenant governor candidate and county elected official in Cheryl Stephens, as well as longtime activist fighter Cheryl Lessin as our keynote speakers this year in Cleveland on March 8 for International Women's Day March Cleveland as we continue to fight for the reproductive, Civil and other rights for women internationally," said Coleman at the rally.

Also at issue, said Coleman, among so many other concerns relative to women's rights, is violence against women, and racism, sexism, voting rights, unnecessary war on women in Ukraine and other places in the world like Ethiopia, and the widespread miseducation of Black girls in our European-led institutions of learning."

Other event speakers were Cuyahoga County executive candidate Tariq Shabazz, who talked about what he would do for women and Black people if elected, and activist Dorothy Walwyn of Father's Lives Matter, who spoke up for domestic violence victims in Cleveland, and Black women in general.

During her keynote speech at Tuesday's rally, Morgan Harper stressed that she is the only U.S. Senate candidate in the U.S. senate race in Ohio this year who has been consistently outspoken in her support of abortion access, and Councilwoman Stephens, a Cleveland Heights Democrat and the only elected official to speak said she is honored to run for lieutenant governor on the gubernatorial ticket of Nan Whaley and to be one of the three keynote speakers chosen by activist women to speak in Cleveland on International Women's Day.

Activist Cheryl Lessin, the last to speak of the three keynote speakers, spoke at length on legislation statewide and nationally that denies women abortion access, and the importance of preserving Roe v Wade, the landmark 1973 U.S. Supreme Court decision that made abortion legal nationwide.

Led by activist Alfred Porter Jr of Black on Black Crime Inc., those at the rally and march also prayed for all of the fallen Black and other women of Cleveland who have died because of heinous violence, including the 11 Black women murdered on Imperial Avenue on the city's east side by serial killer Anthony Sowell, who died in prison last year while on death row.
Events were held across the world on March 8 to celebrate International Women's Day, a day of civil awareness for women worldwide that is designed to combat sex and race discrimination and promote women's rights. The purpose is also to recognize the accomplishments of women, and to push for public policies across the board for women and girls, organizers said.
Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.
Last Updated on Friday, 25 March 2022 23:45

Cleveland Mayor Justin Bibb asks federal court to incorporate voter adopted Issue 24 into the consent decree for police reforms, a request filed jointly by the city and the U.S. Department of Justice, the parties to the consent decree

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Pictured is Cleveland Mayor-elect Justin Bibb


By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor. Coleman is a seasoned Black Cleveland journalist who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper for 17 years and an experienced investigative and political reporter. She is the most read independent journalist in Ohio per Alexa.com

 

 

CLEVELAND, Ohio – The city of Cleveland and the U.S. Department of Justice on Friday filed a joint request in federal district court seeking to incorporate voter adopted Issue 24 into the consent decree for police reforms.


Both entities, the city and the federal government, are parties to the consent decree, which was implemented in 2015 behind a series of questionable police killings of Black people since 2012 It is being monitored by Federal District Judge Solomon Oliver, a Black judge out of the Northern District of Ohio court in Cleveland who will determine whether to grant or deny the parties' joint motion to put voter approved Issue 24 in the hands of a federal district court prematurely.


Mayor Justin Bibb, whom voters elected last year to replace retiring four-term Black mayor Frank Jackson, said in a statement on Friday that incorporating Issue 24 into the consent decree is "the first step towards delivering constitutional policing and implementing the police accountability measures passed by Cleveland voters in November 2021."


But whether Judge Oliver has jurisdiction over a voter adopted police reform measure that changes the city charter simply because he oversees a consent decree between the city of Cleveland and the federal government remains to be seen. Also at issue, say sources, is the constitutionality of federal court intervention over a local ballot initiative adopted by the largely  Black citizens of Cleveland, a majority Black major American city.


On the other hand, Bibb and the city's lawyers say that Issue 24 and the consent decree must operate hand and hand in order to be effective, and that police reforms outlined in Issue 24, by law, must now be included in the consent decree.


Cleveland voters passed Issue 24 last November, a police reform initiative that was on the ballot and was pushed by community activists and the Ohio ACLU, and by Tamir Rice's mother, Samaria Rice, and two other Black women who have lost loved one's at the hands of Cleveland police. Notwithstanding union agreements, it puts  key decisions on police policies and the discipline of officers in the hands of a civilian-led board and commission. And like the court-monitored consent decree,  Issue 24 comes after a host of police killings of Black people since 2012, including the 137 shots shooting deaths of Malissa Williams and Timothy Russell in November of 2012, and Tanisha Anderson and  12-year-old Tamir Rice in 2014.


Mayor Bibb insists that incorporating Issue 24 into the consent decree for police reforms is the best approach and has  confidence that Judge Oliver, who will rule on the request in coming weeks, is likely in agreement


"Once approved, we can move forward with creating the new Community Police Commission and reforming our oversight process,” said Bibb , who has a law director in Mark Griffin, whom he appointed to replace Barbara Langhenry, the former law director with the Jackson administration  and a seasoned attorney who represented the city relative to consent decree proceeding before the federal court when Jackson was mayor.


The mayor said that once the court approval comes he will move forward with creating the new Community Police Commission required by Issue 24 and appointing its members with consent of Cleveland City Council, a 17-member legislative body.


A charter amendment, Issue 24 creates a new Community Police Commission, restructures the disciplinary process for police reviews, changes the review process for police training, and removes the Civilian Police Review Board from reporting to the chief of police or public safety director.


The mayor says he wants to merge Issue 24 with the consent decree because the charter requires such, though nothing in the charter speaks of any such merger.


“In my oath of office I swore to preserve, protect, and defend the city charter," said Mayor Bibb, 34 and the city's fourth Black mayor.


Since taking office in January, Mayor Bibb has moved quickly to deliver police reforms by: 1) expanding the use of the diversion center to reduce incarceration of non-violent offenders, 2) requesting an FBI review of alleged misconduct in the anti-gang unit, 3) providing a full year budget for the new Community Police Commission, just last week, 4) moving forward with a joint amendment request to begin implementing Issue 24


Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com , the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.


Last Updated on Friday, 25 March 2022 23:46
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Eliza Bryant Village in Cleveland's Hough neighborhood to close its nursing facility....By Clevelandurabnnews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio's Black digital news leader

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Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com

CLEVELAND, OhioThe Eliza Bryant Village Board of Trustees has made the difficult decision to close its skilled nursing facility, effective Wed., June 8, according to a statement from trustees.


Formerly named the Cleveland Home For Aged Colored People, Eliza Bryant Village is located at 7201 Wade Park Avenue on the city's largely Black east side in the historic Hough neighborhood in Ward 7, which is now led by Councilwoman Stephanie Howse, a former state legislator whom voters elected in November. The center for the Black elderly in Cleveland was once located at 4807 Cedar Avenue, an historic building built in the early 1900s as a residential facility for older black people.


Eliza Bryant trustee members released the following statement as to the upcoming closure of its skilled nursing facility in Hough:


We will continue to operate our affordable senior housing, home care, senior outreach, adult day services, community transportation, caregiver support groups and Elder Justice Center. Our staff members will assist in relocating residents to area facilities that can capably and compassionately meet their needs.


Our current business model is just not financially sustainable due to skyrocketing operating costs, inadequate Medicaid reimbursement and the impact of the pandemic, among other issues.


We value each and every resident and are committed to helping them find the best quality care in the Cleveland-area to meet and exceed their needs. Also, we will work tirelessly to help our dedicated staff members secure employment at other facilities.


Thank you for the love and support you’ve shown throughout our 126 years of providing long-term care to African Americans in Greater Cleveland. We know our founder, Eliza Simmons Bryant, would like the organization she founded in 1896 to continue providing quality services to our constituency. How we serve may change, but our dedication to this community we love will continue to be expressed in new ways.

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com , the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.


Last Updated on Friday, 25 March 2022 23:47

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio's leader in Black and alternative digital news

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Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.
Last Updated on Friday, 25 March 2022 23:47

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The annual11th Congressional District Caucus Parade is Monday, September 2

11th Congressional District Congresswoman Marcia L. Fudge, a Warrensville Heights Democrat who also chairs the Congressional Black Caucus of Blacks in Congress. waives to the crowd last year at the annual 11th Congressional District Caucus Parade.  This year's parade kicks off on Monday, September 2 on Cleveland's east side at 10:00 am from E. 149th Street and Kinsman Road and ends at Luke Easter Park where the picnic will begin. The event will be replete with political speeches and entertainment from various sources, including local musicians and bands. The well-attended caucus parade was initiated by Democrat Louis Stokes, the retired congressman before Fudge, and the tradition was furthered by the late Democratic Congresswoman Stephanie Tubbs Jones, Fudges' predecessor. Stokes was the first Black congressperson from Ohio and Tubbs Jones was the first Black congresswoman from Ohio