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WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S RALLY AGAINST THE SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V. WADE

BELOW PICTURE: Women's March Cleveland Head Organizer Kathy Wray Coleman (2nd from left) leads 2,500 people in a march for reproductive rights on Oct 2, 2021 on Market Square in Cleveland, Ohio. It was one of the largest marches in the country that day. Photo and coverage by the Plain Dealer and Cleveland.com. CLICK HERE TO GO GO TO CLEVELAND.COM TO READ ON THE COVERAGE OF THE EVENT

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BELOW PICTURE AND UPDATE:

SATURDAY, JUNE 11, 2022-NOON-2PM

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS  TO BE ANNOUNCED

EVENT CONTACT TEL: WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND (216) 659-0473

Women's March Cleveland's Save Roe Rally & March for Civil

Rights and against the U.S. Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade

is Sat., June 11, 2022, noon- 2pm, City Hall steps in

Cleveland, Ohio, 600 Lakeside Avenue E  44114

CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE FACEBOOK EVENT PAGE FOR WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S RALLY & MARCH AGAINST THE U.S. SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V. WADE

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S RALLY & MARCH AGAINST THE U.S. SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V WADE AT MOBILIZEUS.COM




Mayor Bibb, city of Cleveland seeking applications for the new Cleveland Community Police Commission..Mayor Bibb said that the new commission approved by Cleveland voters last year as Issue 24 at the ballot box "has real teeth with new disciplinary power"

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Pictured is Cleveland Mayor Justin Bibb, the city's fourth Black mayor

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor, investigative reporter


CLEVELAND, Ohio – The  city of Cleveland is seeking applications for the new Cleveland Community Police Commission with applications due by April 30.


The city's fourth Black mayor who took office in January, Mayor Justin Bibb, 34, said that residents are encouraged to apply to join the new commission by submitting an application to mayor.clevelandohio.gov/police-reform


"We're proud to open applications for 13 members of the new commission who will be carefully selected following a fair and rigorous application and evaluation process," said Mayor Bibb in a statement to  Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio's Black digital news leader. "This is one of the most important steps in the process to implement police reform, which will serve as a model for the nation on strengthening citizen oversight."


The new community police commission will launch once a majority of members are appointed to four-year terms, replacing the existing commission. Applications will be screened for eligibility based on criteria outlined in Charter Section 115-5 with community input before Mayor Bibb makes recommendations to city council for approval.


Commission members in general must be Cleveland residents and at least two members must come from community organizations focused on civil rights. Also, at least one member must be an attorney or have relevant lived experience of the criminal justice system, mental illness or homelessness.


A product of Cleveland's public schools and former banker with a law degree, Bibb won a nonpartisan mayoral runoff in November over then city council president Kevin Kelley. And while Bibb campaigned in part for police reforms and accountability, Kelley, who is White and an attorney, became somewhat of a police spokesman during his campaign, a campaign that saw Bibb trounce Kelley  in the city's first open election since now retired Frank Jackson, a four-term mayor and the city's third Black mayor, won office in 2005 for his first four-year term.


Bibb said that the new commission will have "real teeth with new disciplinary powers to stamp out misconduct." The mayor, however, stressed that he wants police accountability in a manner that is fair to the citizens of Cleveland as well as the city's police force.


"This is not about targeting police officers, it's about setting a higher ethical standard in our police department to create a culture of respect and accountability," the mayor said. "Residents should feel safe and assured that calling the police won't escalate into violence or brutality and police officers who do the right thing should not be afraid."


The new commission replaces an old commission run primarily by police brass and the mayor's office. It was established last year by Cleveland voters when they overwhelmingly passed Issue 24, a charter amendment and police reform initiative on the ballot that establishes the new commission and was pushed by community activists and the Ohio ACLU, and by Tamir Rice's mother, Samaria Rice, and two other Black women who have lost loved one's at the hands of Cleveland police. Notwithstanding applicable provisions of the city's union agreements with the police and other law enforcement unions, it puts key decisions on police policies and the discipline of officers in the hands of a civilian-led board community police commission That commission seemingly has the authority to enact policies, override the police chief or safety director on disciplinary matters, make decisions on what training officers receive, and exercise authority over hiring practices.


It remains to be seen if litigation will ensue regarding any conflict as to the authority of the new commission and the mandates under the collective bargaining agreement between the city and the Cleveland Police Patrolmen's Association, the labor union for rank and file Cleveland cops.


The city and the U.S Department of Justice are parties to a court-monitored consent decre for police reformse that was implemented in 2015 after a host of police killings of Black people since 2012, including the 137 shots shooting deaths of Malissa Williams, 30, and Timothy Russell, 43, in November of 2012, and 37-year-old Tanisha Anderson and  12-year-old Tamir Rice in 2014. Others killed by Cleveland police over that time span include Brandon Jones, rapper Kenneth "Ball" Smith, and Daniel Ficker, who was White. The latter three were under 28 years old when police snapped out their lives.

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor. Coleman is a seasoned Black Cleveland journalist who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper for 17 years and an experienced investigative and political reporter. She is the most read independent journalist in Ohio per Alexa.com

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Thursday, 07 April 2022 01:50

Ohio Congresswoman Shontel Brown votes in favor of federal bill to legalize recreational marijuana passed by the U.S. House, Brown a Democrat whose largely Black 11th congressional district includes Cleveland....The bill now heads to the U.S. Senate

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Pictured is Ohio 11th Congressional District Congresswoman Shontel M. Brown, a Warrensville Hts. Democrat whose largely Black congressional district includes Cleveland

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com,

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor

WASHINGTON, D.C. Ohio 11th Congressional District Congresswoman Shontel M. Brown (OH-11), a Warrensville Heights Democrat whose largely Black congressional district includes Cleveland and several of its eastern suburbs in Cuyahoga County, voted for the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act. It passed the Democratically-controlled U.S. House of Representatives 220-204 on Friday and now heads to a battle in a 50-50 Senate, a senate that rejected a similar legislative proposal two years ago when Republicans were in the majority.

If ultimately passed by Congress, the comprehensive federal legislation, which was introduced by Rep Jerrold Nadler, a Democrat out of New York, would, in short, decriminalize marijuana at the federal level. Passed largely along party lines, the bill requires a federal tax on marijuana sales that would start at five percent and eventually increase to eight percent over a five year period. And it would remove marijuana from the list of federally controlled substances amd eliminates federal criminal penalties.

Brown says the bill is an attempt by Congress to tackle the injustices marijuana has had on communities of color, particularly relative to the nation's racist and unjust legal system and its disproportionate effect on America's Black community.

“Decades upon decades of failed, discriminatory drug policies have directly harmed Black and Brown communities," said Rep Brown on Friday. "Even today, some Americans serve harsh sentences for marijuana use, while others make millions in profit off of the industry."

The congresswoman, one of two Blacks in Congress from Ohio, went on to say that “the MORE Act would right this historical wrong by decriminalizing marijuana," and that "today, I am proud to cast my vote to decriminalize marijuana and bring us one important step closer to justice.”

Then a Cuyahoga County councilwoman, Brown handily won election last November over Republican Lavern Jones Gore to replace former congresswoman Marcia L. Fudge until a regular election could be held, and to serve out Fudge's unexpired two year congressional term. Fudge vacated her congressional seat in March of 2021 to become secretary of housing and urban development with President Joe Biden's administration, a seat that remained vacant until Brown won the special election in November to replace her.

Congresswoman Brown faces former Ohio senator Nina turner for a May 3 rematch of a primary held last year that she, then a Fudge protege and chairperson of the Cuyahoga County Democratic Party, won over nine other Democratic candidates, including Turner, her closest opponent whom she narrowly defeated, though last's year primary election was a special election and this year's is a regular primary.

If she wins next month's Democratic primary, Brown will face independent journalist and former East Cleveland mayor Eric Brewer, a Democrat-turned-Republican, for a Nov 8 general election. Cuyahoga County and Cleveland are Democratic strongholds led primarily by Democratic public officials, and Ohio's 11th congressional district is overwhelmingly Democratic too.

Regardless of who wins, he or she will lead an 11th congressional district that will later be altered by new congressional redistricting maps, a map, in fact, that will likely include all and not most of Cleveland, and that no longer includes a predominantly Black pocket of Akron and some of its suburbs of Summit County. A 15-district congressional map approved by the Ohio Redistricting Commission in January was struck down by the Ohio Supreme court as favoring Republicans, and thus unconstitutional, and a subsequent map submitted to the court by the commission in March remains in dispute but will likely go forward on the May 3 ballot since the court will not hear the challenge until after that date.

Currently 9th Congressional District Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur, a Toledo Democrat and the longest serving woman in the U.S. House of Representatives, represents parts of Cleveland's largely White west side, and Brown, in addition to suburban territories in Cuyahoga and Summit counties and a small segment of Akron, Cleveland's largely Black east side.

While medical marijuana is legal in Ohio, recreational marijuana remains illegal. The recreational use of cannabis, however, has been legalized in 18 states, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and D.C, and another 13 states and the U.S. Virgin Islands have decriminalized its use.

Criminal justice reform advocates and some Black scholars say marijuana's deeply racist history is rooted in the need for comprehensive criminal justice reforms across the board.

The over-representation of Black Americans in the nation’s justice system is well documented.

 

"Black men comprise about 13 percent of the male population, but about 35 percent of those incarcerated," writes Dr. Elizabeth Hinton, a Black assistant professor in the Department of History and Department of African and African-American Studies at Harvard University.

"One in three Black men born today can expect to be incarcerated in his lifetime, compared to one in six Latino men and one in 17 white men," Hinton said. Black women are similarly impacted as one in 18 Black women born in 2001 is likely to be incarcerated sometime in her life, compared to one in 111 White women."

Bias by decision makers at all stages of the justice process disadvantages Black people," Dr. Hinton argues. "Studies have found that they are more likely to be stopped by the police, detained pretrial, charged with more serious crimes, and sentenced more harshly than white people."

As federal lawmakers continue to debate whether to make recreational marijuana legal on the federal level,  voters and state legislatures from across  the country, aside from in the 18 states that have already legalized its recreational use, continue to confront the issue, one way or another.

Ohio lawmakers and the state's Republican-dominated state legislature have rejected proposed legislation to legalize recreational Marijuana under state law, and voters, in 2015, turned down a private citizens-led ballot initiative to approve recreational pot use in the state.

The city of Cleveland passed an ordinance in 2020 to decriminalize low-level possession of marijuana. It eliminates fines and jail time for possession of up to 200 grams, or just over seven ounces of marijuana.


By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor. Coleman is a seasoned Black Cleveland journalist who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper for 17 years and an experienced investigative and political reporter. She is the most read independent journalist in Ohio per Alexa.com

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Monday, 25 April 2022 18:44

Former Cuyahoga County auditor Frank Russo dies, Russo a former big wig with the county Democratic party who was imprisoned like former county commissionerJimmy Dimora as to the widespread county public corruption scandal.... By editor Kathy Wray Coleman

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Pictured are former Cuyahoga County auditor Frank Russo and former county commissioner Jimmy Dimora, Dimora also a former chair of the county Democratic party

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor

CLEVELAND, Ohio -Frank Russo, a former big wig with the Cuyahoga County Democratic Party alongside  former county commissioner Jimmy Dimora and a disgraced former Cuyahoga County auditor, has died.  He was 72 and the cause of death has not been made public.

He suffered from diabetes and heart problems and was released from the federal penitentiary in 2020 for such reasons, as well as- due to the coronavirus pandemic.

A former Mayfield Hts councilman, county recorder during the early 80s, and elected county auditor from 1997 until 2010, Russo was convicted in 2009 of public corruption charges relative to a longstanding  county public corruption scandal that took off in 1998 and has seen more than 75 Democratic party affiliates charged and convicted., mainly businessmen but also including two former common pleas judges who served prison time and a host of others

Then-U.S. District Judge Kate O’Malley sentenced him to 22 years in federal prison in December 2010 via a plea deal, and Dimora, also a former  powerful chair of the county Democratic party, was later sentenced to 28 years after a jury convicted him of federal corruption charges.

County Democrats say for the most part that the sentences against Russo, Dimora and nearly the whole group of cases that the Akron judge presided over were excessive and pushed by O'Malley, allegedly to appease Republicans and others, including the Plain Dealer Newspaper, Ohio's largest newspaper that published a plethora of articles and editorials condemning the corruption.

Russo’s sentence had been reduced by nearly eight years because he cooperated with federal officials and allegedly snitched, sources say, on other Democrats. He also was ordered to pay nearly $7 million in restitution. Prosecutors said he and Dimora ran a political machine cultivated through bribes, gifts and other illegalities.

Dimora said during his criminal ordeal that he had allegedly bribed at least 10 area Democratic judges to fix cases. Cooperating with the federal government, Russo  testified against his former friend at his corruption trial. Then 56, a jury found Dimora guilty on 36 counts, including racketeering, bribery, conspiracy Hobbs Act conspiracy, and tax charges,

With the Plain Dealer at the helm and pushing for alternatives, the public corruption fallout led to an unprecedented change in county government. That voter adopted change in county governance, which took effect in 2011, replaced three county commissioners and the county elected offices, all but the still-elected common please judges and county prosecutor, with an elected county executive and 11-member county council.

Those appointed county offices that the county executive now makes include the sheriff, county auditor, clerk of courts, fiscal officer, and county treasurer

Black leaders and the Cleveland NAACP, led by former county commissioner Peter Lawson Jones, then Congresswoman Marcia L. Fudge and then Cleveland NAACP president George Forbes, a former Cleveland City Council president,  opposed the change in county governance before it was approved by voters in 2009 by a two-to-one margin. At the time they worried that the current county governance disenfranchises voters and Black people, and puts too much power in the hands of one official, a county executive, now  Armond Budish, a Democrat and former speaker of the Ohio House of Representatives.

Budish is not seeking reelection to another four-year term this year after his office was raided twice by the FBI following questionable deaths of some10 or more inmates in the troubled county jail since 2018. He has also faced criminal investigations of his inner staff and convictions of key members of his administration. including the former jail warden, jail director, and human resources director.

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.


Last Updated on Saturday, 09 April 2022 16:21

Keith Sweat to perform in Cleveland this month at Playhouse Square with special guest performers Silk and Ginuwine....By Clevelandjurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio's Black digital news leader

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Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor-in-chief

CLEVELAND, Ohio- R&B singer and soulful crooner Keith will perform in Cleveland, Ohio at Playhouse Square on Sat, April 16, 2022 with special guest performers Silk and Ginuwine.


Sweat tweeted the following:

"Cleveland, OH., get ready! I’m coming to SWEAT Playhouse Square out on April 16th. Oh yes, I’m bringing some friends. It’s going down.....There’s no other place to be APRIL 16th! See you there"

An American singer, songwriter, and record producer, Sweat was an early figure in the new jack swing musical movement. He is known for his collection of hits including "I Want Her", "Make It Last Forever", "I'll Give All My Love to You", "Make You Sweat", "Get Up on It", "Twisted" and "Nobody". He has released 13 solo albums (2 as a part of the R&B supergroup LSG) and discovered the groups Silk and Kut Klose.

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Saturday, 02 April 2022 04:16

President Biden signs Emmett Till anti-lynching bill into law, CNN reports

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Pictured is the late Emmett Till

WASHINGTON, D.C- President Joe Biden signed a bill into law on Tuesday that makes lynching a federal hate crime, acknowledging how racial violence has left a lasting scar on the nation and asserting that these crimes are not a relic of a bygone era.

The bill Biden signed into law, the Emmett Till Antilynching Act of 2022, is named after a 14-year-old Black boy from Chicago who was brutally murdered by a group of White men in Mississippi for allegedly whistling at a White woman in 1955. His murder sparked national outrage and was a catalyst for the emerging civil rights movement.

At a White House Rose Garden signing ceremony, the President didn't hold back in describing the history of racial violence experienced by Black Americans and its continued impact.
He said, "Lynching was pure terror to enforce the lie that not everyone. CLICK HERE TO GO TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE AT CNN.COM
Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 30 March 2022 23:34

Ohio's governor race: Democratic candidates Nan Whaley and John Cranley debate......By Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio's Black digital news leader

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Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor-in-chief

WILBERFORCE, Ohio- Democratic gubernatorial candidates former Cincinnatti Mayor John Cranley and former Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley debated as Ohio's May 3 primary election nears. Above is the video of the debate

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor. Coleman is a seasoned Black Cleveland journalist who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper for 17 years and an experienced investigative and political reporter. She is the most read independent journalist in Ohio per Alexa.com

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 30 March 2022 22:19

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The annual11th Congressional District Caucus Parade is Monday, September 2

11th Congressional District Congresswoman Marcia L. Fudge, a Warrensville Heights Democrat who also chairs the Congressional Black Caucus of Blacks in Congress. waives to the crowd last year at the annual 11th Congressional District Caucus Parade.  This year's parade kicks off on Monday, September 2 on Cleveland's east side at 10:00 am from E. 149th Street and Kinsman Road and ends at Luke Easter Park where the picnic will begin. The event will be replete with political speeches and entertainment from various sources, including local musicians and bands. The well-attended caucus parade was initiated by Democrat Louis Stokes, the retired congressman before Fudge, and the tradition was furthered by the late Democratic Congresswoman Stephanie Tubbs Jones, Fudges' predecessor. Stokes was the first Black congressperson from Ohio and Tubbs Jones was the first Black congresswoman from Ohio