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WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S RALLY AGAINST THE SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V. WADE

BELOW PICTURE: Women's March Cleveland Head Organizer Kathy Wray Coleman (2nd from left) leads 2,500 people in a march for reproductive rights on Oct 2, 2021 on Market Square in Cleveland, Ohio. It was one of the largest marches in the country that day. Photo and coverage by the Plain Dealer and Cleveland.com. CLICK HERE TO GO GO TO CLEVELAND.COM TO READ ON THE COVERAGE OF THE EVENT

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BELOW PICTURE AND UPDATE:

SATURDAY, JUNE 11, 2022-NOON-2PM

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS  TO BE ANNOUNCED

EVENT CONTACT TEL: WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND (216) 659-0473

Women's March Cleveland's Save Roe Rally & March for Civil

Rights and against the U.S. Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade

is Sat., June 11, 2022, noon- 2pm, City Hall steps in

Cleveland, Ohio, 600 Lakeside Avenue E  44114

CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE FACEBOOK EVENT PAGE FOR WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S RALLY & MARCH AGAINST THE U.S. SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V. WADE

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S RALLY & MARCH AGAINST THE U.S. SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V WADE AT MOBILIZEUS.COM




Former president Trump to rally in Ohio on April 23 for select GOP candidates ahead of the May 3, 2022 primary election as the GOP primary for the U.S. Senate seat up for grabs because U.S. Senator Rob Portman is retiring becomes a political bloodbath

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Pictured is former president Donald Trump

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com

By Kathy Wray Coleman, political and investigative reporter, editor-in-chief

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Former president Donald Trump will speak at a GOP-led rally in Ohio ahead of the May 3 primary election, an effort, say sources, to boost voter turnout for Republican candidates, though he has not yet announced an endorsed candidate for governor or for the high profile U.S.  Senate race for the seat up for grabs due to the upcoming retirement of GOP Sen. Rob Portman of Cincinnati.

Trump will headline a GOP rally at the Delaware County Fairgrounds in Delaware, north of Columbus, on the evening of  April 23, organizers said.

Several Republicans are vying for the nomination to succeed Portman in what has become a political bloodbath. Among them are author and venture capitalist J.D. Vance, businessman Mike Gibbons , former state Treasurer Josh Mandel, former Ohio GOP Chair Jane Timken, and state Sen. Matt Dolan.

U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan, attorney Morgan Harper and tech executive Traci Johnson round out the  Democratic candidates vying to replace Portman, Ryan a Youngstown area Democrat who is not seeking reelection to Congress this year and the front-runner candidate for the Democratic primary .

Both Harper, a former consumer protection attorney with the Obama administration, and Johnson are Black.

The former president last visited Ohio on June 26 of last year and spoke at  a GOP rally at the Lorain County Fairgrounds. According to Trump's Save America PAC, last year's rally marked the first of many appearances by the former president "in support of candidates and causes that further the MAGA agenda and accomplishments of President Trump’s administration."

That  GOP rally last year in Wellington, Ohio where Trump spoke was to support Max Miller, whom he has endorsed in the primary for Ohio’s 16th Congressional District against GOP incumbent Rep. Anthony Gonzalez.The rally later this month where the former president will speak is also to stomp for Miller, sources said.

A conservative one-term president and real estate mogul, Trump, a staunch Republican, lost reelection in 2020 to current president Joe Biden, a Democrat and former U.S.  senator and vice president under former president Barack Obama, the nation's first Black president. But the former president, still a controversial figure, remains a viable force for GOP endorsements as gubernatorial and congressional and U.S. Senate races heat up and the November midterm elections near.By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor. Coleman is a seasoned Black Cleveland journalist who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper for 17 years and an experienced investigative and political reporter. She is the most read independent journalist in Ohio per Alexa.com-Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Friday, 15 April 2022 11:06

Another Black inmate dies in the Cuyahoga County Jail in Cleveland where more than 12 inmates have died since 2018, a jail deemed inhumane and unconstitutional via a 2018 U.S. Marshal's report.... Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.

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Pictured is Shondo Moffitt, who collapsed and died Mon, April 11, 2022 in the Cuyahoga County jail in Cleveland, Ohio
Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com
By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor-in-chief, investigative reporter

CLEVELAND, Ohio-Another inmate has died in the troubled Cuyahoga County Jail in Cleveland where an astonishing nine inmates died between 2018-2019 and several more thereafter, including in 2020, U.S. Marshals issuing a stinging report in November of 2018 that deemed the gross mistreatment of the majority Black inmates inhumane and unconstitutional.

According to a county spokesperson, Shondo Moffitt , who was Black, collapsed at the jail at around 12:30 p.m. on Monday afternoon. He had been in the facility since Feb 15 for failure to appear for a Feb 25 hearing. He was taken to MetroHealth Medical Center where he was later declared dead.


The attorney for the  39-year-old man  had  filed a motion with a judge requesting that his client  be released to continue his medical treatment. While the dead inmate was Black, both the sheriff and the county jail warden are White. The county is roughly 29 percent Black and a disproportionate number of the inmates are Black, mainly Black men.


Sheriff Christopher Paul Viland was confirmed as sheriff in March of 2021 and the current jail warden is Michelle Henry, who has held the post since August of 2020


“On behalf of my department, I want the family and friends of Mr. Moffitt to know that our condolences on their loss are sincere and we will treat the investigation into this matter with all due care and concern,"County Sheriff Viland said in a statement.


A cause of death has not yet been determined by the county examiner following an autopsy.


Moffitt had two open felony cases in Cuyahoga County, one from a year ago for illegal possession of a firearm where he skipped his sentencing in that trial, and  another, a felony theft case.


In early January the family of a man who authorities say was beaten to death by his cellmate in 2020 received $1.1 million to settle a negligence and wrongful lawsuit against the county, and others. The man, Shone Trawick, a 48-year-old father of six, was serving a six months sentence for assault


Twenty-eight-year-old Devauntae Rayshon Daye, who was a Black transgender woman, is also among the fallen, and died in the jail in August of 2020. She was found unresponsive in her jail cell, authorities said, and was later pronounced dead. She was facing charges of felonious assault and aggravated robbery for allegedly robbing a man and hitting him with a brick.

This latest county jail inmate death comes as county officials embark upon plans to build a 1904-inmate capacity jail that has an inmate expansion unit to house more Black people, sources said, a multi million dollar project funded primarily by taxpayers. Cuyahoga County is the second largest of 88 counties statewide, and it is a Democratic stronghold.

The damning report released in November of 2018 by U.S. Marshals on county jail conditions generated local and national news, a dreadful look at how inmates are mistreated such as withholding food for punishment, jailing juveniles with adults, rat and roach infested jail facilities, and a paramilitary jail corrections officers unit dubbed "The Men in Black" who intimidate and harass inmates. The report also found profound mistreatment of female inmates, and that pregnant women were being jailed on floor mats and denied adequate healthcare.

Several lawsuits remain pending regarding the county's now infamous jail and Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish, who is not seeking reelection this year and whose offices in downtown Cleveland have been raided twice since the series of jail deaths.There have been indictments and convictions of at least nine jail guards, the former jail director, and former  jail warden Eric Ivey, who is Black. .

Ivey took a misdemeanor plea deal with no jail time before Common Pleas Judge Nancy Fuerst with an agreement that he  act as a snitch.

In the midst of it all then sheriff Cliff Pinkney, the county's first Black sheriff appointed by Budish, resigned. Until recently, the Cuyahoga County Jail was the state's second most populated jail behind Franklin County, which includes Columbus and is the largest of Ohio's counties.

The FBI and other authorities have been swarming the jail since 2018 after inmates began popping up dead. The Cleveland jail merged with the county  jail per a regionalism plan adopted by county and city officials in 2017, which created nothing but more problems.

Activists say the jail remains a problem and that they are also concerned with an array of other issues, including excessive bail, malicious prosecutions, racism, grand jury tampering, indictment fixing, denial of indigent counsel and speedy trial rights to Black defendants, and excessive sentences. Data also show that White inmates were getting favorable treatment and that Black inmates were more harshly disciplined.

Cleveland community activists picketed in front of the Cuyahoga County Justice Center in 2018 over judicial and prosecutorial malfeasance, police misconduct, and the overcrowding of the county jail, a continuation of activist rallies that began in 2016.

Hastened by the coronavirus outbreak, community activists had been picketing regularly at the Justice Center in downtown Cleveland over jail conditions, in front of Budish' gated home in affluent Beachwood, where they called for his resignation, and at county administrative headquarters before county council meetings.

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor. Coleman is a seasoned Black Cleveland journalist who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper for 17 years and an experienced investigative and political reporter. She is the most read independent journalist in Ohio per Alexa.com Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Monday, 25 April 2022 15:32

18-year-old Black woman ( Tamara McLoyd) charged last year with killing a Cleveland cop is indicted on more charges....Cleveland police officer Shane Bartek was shot and killed on New Year's Eve....By investigative reporter Kathy Wray Coleman of Cleveland

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Pictured are 18-year-old Tamara McLoyd, who has been indicted on two new robbery charges since a Cuyahoga County grand jury last year indicted her on charges of aggravated murder, aggravated robbery, felonious assault, grand theft, and having weapons under disability relative to the New Year's Eve carjacking and shooting death of 25-year-old Cleveland police officer Shane Bartek

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com
By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor-in-chief

CLEVELAND, Ohio - An 18-year old Black Cleveland area woman charged in connection with the New Year's Eve carjacking and shooting death of Cleveland police officer Shane Bartek in the Kamms Corner neighborhood on the city's largely White west side was indicted on Tuesday by a Cuyahoga County grand jury on two more robbery charges, including a Christmas Day robbery in the apartment complex where Bartek lived at the time he was killed.

Tamara McLoyd, of Garfield Heights, who has been in trouble with the law since she was a juvenile, faces two additional charges of aggravated robbery and weapons under disability. She has not been arraigned and her attorney, Kevin Cafferkey, would not comment to reporters

In addition to the two new charges, McLoyd faces several charges relative to the officer's shooting death, including aggravated murder, aggravated robbery, felonious assault, grand theft, and having weapons under disability. She also faces charges regarding two alleged robberies in November, one at a Happy's Pizza restaurant, as well as an additional charge for an alleged arson. She remains in the Cuyahoga County jail on a $5.5 million bond in the murder case and has pleaded not guilty in that case and as to the previous cases.

Though Officer Bartek, 25, was off-duty when he was killed, Cleveland Mayor Justin Bibb deemed his killing that of an on-duty cop in order that the fallen officer's family could qualify for benefits, including funeral and burial monies. Cleveland Police Patrolmen's President Jeff Follmer had argued that since Bartek struggled with McLoyd before she allegedly gunned him down, that he was, in fact, acting as an on-duty police officer. How this questionable determination by the city that Bartek was on-duty when he was killed will impact the upcoming likely trial and McLoyd's constitutional right to a fair trial remains to be seen.

Hundreds of police officers from across the state, including as far away as Cincinnati, were in attendance to bid farewell to Bartek at funeral services in early January. Bartek's twin sister, Summer Bartek, was among the speakers, and she gave a touching tribute.

“I wish I could tell him one more time how much I admired him,” Summer Bartek said. “How he has always been my idol growing up and always will. I am 13 minutes older than Shane, but he always treated me like a little sister.”

Interim police chief Wayne Drummond, a 32-year law enforcement veteran, has called the tragic shooting death of the police officer "senseless."

Drummond was also among the speakers at the funeral, and he described Bartek as an officer and a gentleman, and a role model for other patrolmen.

“While I did not have the privilege to know Shane personally, I have recently talked with many officers who spoke of him very highly,” Drummond said. “I’ve learned that courage came naturally to Shane. And I’ve heard stories that tell me Shane truly embodied the virtues needed to be an outstanding law enforcement officer.”

Prosecutors say McLoyd  was on probation and under the supervision of the Lorain County Juvenile Court for a robbery conviction when she allegedly shot and killed Bartek.  Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Mike O'Malley told reporters that at the time McLoyd had been convicted of robbery as a juvenile in Lorain County Juvenile Court and that should not have been on the streets, though a judge who had released her from custody obviously disagreed with his stance.

Officer Bartek was shot twice in the back in his car, which was parked outside of his apartment complex. He was pronounced dead after being transported by EMS from the scene of the shooting to Fairview Hospital.

Surveillance video purportedly reveals that McLoyd drove off in the officer's car after she allegedly shot him. She ultimately delivered the car to Anthony Butler Jr, 28 and of Bedford Heights, the other suspect in the case is charged with fleeing and receiving stolen property. Police recovered the stolen car following a high speed chase through the city and several other communities.

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor. Coleman is a seasoned Black Cleveland journalist who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper for 17 years and an experienced investigative and political reporter. She is the most read independent journalist in Ohio per Alexa.com

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Friday, 15 April 2022 18:15

Cleveland Cavaliers end the regular season with a 133-115 win over Milwaukee to win No 8 play-in seed....By Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathy Wray Colemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio's Black digital news leader

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the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest.
Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com.
CLEVELAND, Ohio- Led by head coach J.B. Bickerstaff, the Cleveland Cavaliers ended their regular season with a bang on Sunday evening by defeating the Milwaukee Bucks 133-115 before a sellout crowd at Rocket Mortgage FieldHouse in downtown Cleveland, a much needed win that strengthened Cleveland's spot as the Eastern Conference’s No. 8 seed heading into the play-in tournament that could lead to a playoffs spot.

Sunday's win closes out the regular season for the Cavs with a 44-38 win-loss record, a comeback win from Friday night's embarrassing loss to the Brooklyn Nets that saw the Cavs lose the chance at hosting the first play-in game. And it was, by all accounts, an indication of what success could lie ahead as Cleveland gets ready for a play-in game without Jarrett Allen, the team's All-Star center who was sidelined indefinitely after breaking his left middle finger in the win over the Toronto Raptors in early March.

Kevin Love made eight three- pointers and scored 32 points and Rookie Evan Mobley added 18 points for the Cavs. Milwaukee rookie Sandro Mamukelashvili had a season-high 28 points coupled with 13 rebounds.

The Bucks erased a 40-point deficit to 12 in the fourth quarter against Cleveland’s reserves with the Cavs ultimately winning by 18 points, a win that was all but assured after All-star point guard Darius Garland, who  led the Cavs with 31 points in their loss on Friday against the Nets, and Lauie Markanen returned to the floor.

“They just played the game with purpose," said coach Bickerstaff after Sunday's game, adding that "we believe we can beat anybody in this league."

So what exactly is a play-in-tournament in comparison to the NBA playoffs? There are 30 teams in the NBA and the top seeds are guaranteed a playoffs spot .The play-in tournament  is a series of winner-take-all games featuring the seven-10 seeds in each conference, the Eastern and Western Conference, and they compete for a spot in the playoffs. It begins Tuesday with seventh-seeded Brooklyn Nets hosting the eighth-seeded Cavs, with the winner claiming the No. 7 spot in the Eastern Conference playoffs.

If Cleveland wins on Tuesday over Brooklyn, it has secured a playoff spot, and if they lose, the Cavaliers will get another bite at the apple and will play an elimination game with the winner of Wednesday's game between Atlanta and Charlotte, the No 9 and No 10 seeds respectively. The process is the same, but with different teams, for the play-in tournament for the NBA's Western Conference teams.

Tuesday's upcoming game against Brooklyn has some fans uneasy since former Cavs player Kyrie Irving and the great Kevin Durant led the Nets to their last victory over Cleveland last Friday, just two days before Cleveland played its last regular season game against Milwaukee. All eyes are on on Tuesday night's game.

A comeback kid who has re-energized NBA basketball in Cleveland and has taken his team from a total of just 60 wins in all of the last three regular seasons combined to 44 regular season game wins in 2021-2022, Bickerstaff, one of 13 Black head coaches in the NBA, has been Cleveland's lead coach since March of 2020. He was once the head coach for the Memphis Grizzlies and was Cleveland's assistant and associate coach when he replaced then head coach John Beilein, who resigned in February of 2020.
Cleveland was at risk for dropping from the eighth spot to the tenth spot in the Eastern Conference had Sunday's game against Milwaukee been a loser game, injury after injury shattering what was a fifth place standing in the Eastern Conference earlier in the season, and then a seventh place spot after the lost on March 27 to Bucks. But a source said that "eighth place is good enough to get Cleveland in a position to compete for a playoffs spot."
It will be the first time Cleveland fans can look forward to Cleveland likely playing in a playoffs tournament since 2018 when the Cavaliers lost the Finals and LeBron James, then a member of Cleveland's team, packed up and headed to Los Angeles as a free agent, and via a multi million dollar contract. Cleveland has been in the playoffs a total of 22 times in 51 seasons

LeBron James has a history with Clevelanders and Ohioans that dates back to his youth.

Now an NBA megastar, and a billionaire, James, 37, played basketball for St. Vincent–St. Mary High School in his hometown on Akron, and was selected by Cleveland with the first overall pick of the 2003 NBA draft. After failing to win a championship with Cleveland, he left in 2010 to sign as a free agent with Miami, a move he announced in an ESPN special titled The Decision, and one of the most controversial free-agent decisions in sports history.

He  his first two NBA championships while playing for the Heat in 2012 and 2013; in both of these years, he also earned league MVP and Finals MVP. After his fourth season with the Heat in 2014, James opted out of his contract to re-sign with the Cavaliers. In 2016, he led the Cavaliers to victory over the Golden State Warriors in the NBA Finals by coming back from a 3–1 deficit, delivering the franchise's first championship and ending Cleveland's 52-year professional sports title drought.

In 2018, James exercised his contract option to leave the Cavaliers and signed with the Lakers, whom he led to win the 2020 championship He is 17-1 against the Cavs, who lost to the Lakers on March 27, 131-120  following James' 38-point triple double. It was James' only visit to his native state of Ohio this season, other than the All-Star Game in February.
Last Updated on Friday, 15 April 2022 11:21

U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown of Cleveland votes yes as Ketanji Brown Jackson is confirmed as the first Black woman U.S. Supreme Court justice... Brown called it "a historic day in the nation's history"

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Newly confirmed U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson, the nation's first Black female justice, U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH), a Cleveland Democrat, the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall (wearing blue tie),  a Civil Rights icon and the court's first Black justice, and Justice Clarence Thomas (wearing red tie), a conservative member of the court

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor

WASHINGTON, D.C.-President Joe Biden nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson, a former U.S. District Court judge out of D.C. who served on the bench for nine years before the president, in 2021, tapped her to become a  federal judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in Washington and the first Black woman nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court, was confirmed 53-47 by a 50-50 U.S. Senate on Thursday.

When she ultimately steps up to the bench, Justice Jackson will become the first Black woman justice to serve on the nine-member court and its third Black justice behind the late Thurgood Marshall, the court's first Black justice and a Civil Rights icon, and Clarence Thomas, a current member of the court and a conservative justice who routinely votes against Blacks and women relative to public policy issues that come before the court.
Her confirmation is, in no uncertain terms, unprecedented in American history.

Vice President Kamala Harris, the nation's first Black and first woman vice president, presided over the Senate confirmation vote as three Senate Republicans, senators Susan Murkowski, Susan Collins and Mitt Romney, broke ranks to join all 50 Democrats in supporting her nomination. The judge and President Biden watched the Senate vote come in from the White House and after Republicans cleared Senate chambers after the vote count was announced Democratic senators gave Jackson a standing ovation.

Flanked by the president and vice president, Jackson said during her speech at the White House after her confirmation that "we've made it, all of us," a likely reference to Black women in America. And she said that "I am the dream and the hope of a slave."

The retiring U.S. Sen Rob Portman, a Cincinnati Republican, voted against her nomination, Ohio's other U.S. senator, Sherrod Brown, a popular JFK-type Cleveland Democrat, supported her, Brown saying in a statement on Thursday that Jackson is supremely qualified and that her confirmation is historic.

“This is a historic day in our nation’s history, and I was proud to be able to vote to confirm Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson," said Sen. Brown, a senior member of Congress and Ohio's most powerful Democrat. "Justice Jackson’s diverse set of experiences and perspectives have long been lacking from our nation’s highest court. These experiences make her an ideal justice.”

Sen Brown met with the judge on Tuesday and said later in publicly announcing his support that “Judge Jackson and I had a good discussion about the dignity of work and her perspectives on protecting workers’ rights and civil rights, among other important issues facing the Court."

On the district court bench in D.C. from 2013 -2021 and until she became a federal appeals court judge last year, Justice Jackson replaces retiring Justice Stephen Bryer, whom she once clerked for. Her appointment is not expected to tilt the court's 6-3 conservative majority as Bryer, a Clinton appointee, is considered a moderate liberal by most standards.

A Harvard educated judge and Black legal scholar, Justice Jackson will join Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, both President Obama appointees, as the three who make up the liberal wing of the court.

The court's 116th justice, she also joins Kagan, Sotomayer and conservative justice Amy Coney Barrett as one of four women currently on the court, and she is the sixth woman to join the court since its first assembly in 1790. Also of significance is that she joins the court as the midterm elections near and as the court prepares to hear high profile cases on the death penalty, criminal procedure, and the first amendment, and relative to Roe v Wade, the 1974 landmark Supreme Court decision that made abortion legal nationwide.

During confirmation hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee last month she vowed to be independent and to approach cases from a neutral perspective. She also rejected frivolous GOP attacks at those hearings on her judicial record as a judge who was soft on crime as "nothing  further from the truth." And she told Senate Judiciary Committee members, both Democrats and Republicans alike, that her impartial record as a judge over the last decade speaks for itself.

“I have been a judge for nearly a decade now, and I take that responsibility and my duty to be independent very seriously,” Jackson said. “I decide cases from a neutral posture. I evaluate the facts, and I interpret and apply the law to the facts of the case before me, without fear or favor, consistent with my judicial oath.”

When U.S. Sen Cory Booker of New Jersey used his turn at Senate confirmation hearings to introduce a litany of reasons why she is qualified, and then spoke at length on the significance of her nomination and her pathway to becoming a Supreme Court nominee, the judge broke into tears.

President Biden,  a former U.S. senator who was vice president under Barack Obama, the country's first Black president and a former U.S. senator himself, ousted incumbent Republican president Donald Trump to take the White House in 2020. Thereafter, he  fulfilled his campaign promise of nominating a Black woman for the U.S. Supreme Court when he did so earlier this year.  At the time the president, a staunch Democrat,  called Jackson one of the nation’s brightest legal minds  and said that she has "a deep understanding of the Constitution as an enduring charter of liberty, much like Breyer."

Born in Washington, D.C. and raised in Florida, Jackson attended Harvard University both for undergraduate studies and law school, where,like Obama, she served as an editor on the Harvard Law Review.

She began her legal career with three clerk ships, including one with Justice Bryer, whom she would later replace on the nation's highest court. Though President Biden nominated her to the  United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia in 2021 to replace Merrick Garland, the the U.S. attorney general with the Biden administration, it was then president Obama who nominated to her prior judgeship as  a  district judge for the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

The Honorable Justice Jackson, 51, has been married to Patrick G. Jackson, a heart surgeon, since 1996, and the couple has two grown daughters, Leila and Telia.

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor. Coleman is a seasoned Black Cleveland journalist who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper for 17 years and an experienced investigative and political reporter. She is the most read independent journalist in Ohio per Alexa.com

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 12 April 2022 00:26

Mayor Bibb, city of Cleveland ask court to expunge some 4, 000 low-level marijuana convictions....Cleveland City Council, in 2020 and via an ordinance sponsored by Councilman Blaine Griffin, eliminated jail and fines for possession of up to 200 grams

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Pictured is Cleveland Mayor Justin M. Bibb (wearing eyeglasses) in the condensed picture in this article and as to the expanded version pictured are Cleveland Mayor  Justin Bibb, City Council President Blaine Griffin (wearing red tie), Cleveland Municipal Court Presiding and Administrative Judge Michelle Earley, Cleveland Law Director Mark Griffin, and Chief City Prosecutor Acqueelah Jordan

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor

CLEVELAND, Ohio-Cleveland Mayor Justin M. Bibb joined Chief Prosecutor Aqueelah Jordan, Law Director Mark Griffin, and City Council President Blaine Griffin at the Justice Center in downtown Cleveland as Jordan and Griffin filed motions in the Cleveland Municipal Court clerk's office for judges to hold hearings to possibly expunge 4,077 records of low-level marijuana convictions dating back to 2017. Though guided by state law and other authorities, expunging a criminal record in Ohio remains at the discretion of trial court judges. Most of the people impacted by the motions filing are Black and Cleveland is a largely Black major American city of some 372,000 people. "Today, we are moving forward with [seeking to clear the names] of over 4,000 residents who deserve a fresh start," said Mayor Bibb, 34. "This is just one way we can make progress on criminal justice reform to balance the scales and remove barriers to employment and reentry." At least 455 of the cases include marijuana convictions that occurred since city council, in 2020 and per an ordinance sponsored by Griffin, eliminated jail and fines for possession of up to 200 grams, or just over seven ounces of marijuana. Griffin said that Cleveland needs to keep up with the times in terms of criminal justice reforms and associated public policy measures. "This is the natural progression of what we (at council) wanted to see, first to decriminalize, then to have records expunged," said Council President Griffin. "Before we passed the legislation, we put together a working group with activists and criminal justice experts." Under Ohio law, possession of marijuana of less than 200 grams is a misdemeanor, and more than 200 grams is a felony of varying degrees depending on the amount confiscated. Cleveland's minor misdemeanor ordinance was amended in 2020 to eliminate possible fines and jail time, including the $150 fine, and to make it applicable up to 200 grams. But regardless of whether a fine or jail time is eliminated regarding the conviction, there is often a stigma associated with drug possession on a criminal record as it sometimes interferes with employment opportunities, and educational, housing and other opportunities, which is partly why having a criminal record expunged is beneficial. The 13-member largely Black Cleveland Municipal Court, which also includes a separate municipal housing court, is led by administrative and presiding judge Michelle Earley, who is Black. How long a time period is needed for the judges to rule on the motions remains in question and until infinity is obviously not the answer as Cleveland judges traditionally have difficulty managing the dockets of cases that are routinely before them. Chief City Prosecutor Aqueelah Jordan, has said that "our judges are very busy and we are going to be very supportive of whatever time they need.” Judges in Ohio, however, are subject to the criminal, civil and local rules of procedure, appellate and Ohio Supreme Court rules, as well as the Ohio Rules of Superintendence, among other authorities. Typically it should take up to six weeks to get a record expunged but since the pandemic the judges dockets have been moving slowly and some cases can linger on for years. Ohio’s new law on expunging criminal records became effective as of April 12, 2021 and under such law a person, absent a felony sex crime, crime of violence, DUI/OVI offense, or first, second- or third-degree felony on a his or her criminal record, qualifies for the unlimited expunging of criminal records. Other convictions qualify under limited circumstances by statute. While medical marijuana is legal in Ohio, recreational marijuana remains illegal. The recreational use of cannabis, however, has been legalized in 18 states, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and D.C, and another 13 states and the U.S.Virgin Islands have decriminalized its use. The U.S. House of Representatives voted to approve H.R. 3617, the Marijuana Opportunity, Reinvestment, and Expungement (MORE) Act, congressional legislation that would remove marijuana from the list of federally controlled substances and eliminate federal criminal penalties. It is currently before the U.S. Senate for possible approval. Mayor Bibb said that the city of Cleveland wants 4,000 or so misdemeanor marijuana criminal records expunged by the majority Black judges in Cleveland's municipal court and that the request is timely following passage last week by the U.S. House of the MORE Act, a bill that awaits approval in the Senate. If it is ultimately passed by Congress it would remove marijuana from the list of federally controlled substances and eliminate federal criminal penalties. "The motions filed today show that Cleveland is leading the way on criminal justice reform," said Mayor Bibb, the city's fourth Black mayor, and a progressive mayor who won a nonpartisan mayoral election last November over then city council president Kevin Kelley by a landslide.

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor. Coleman is a seasoned Black Cleveland journalist who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper for 17 years and an experienced investigative and political reporter. She is the most read independent journalist in Ohio per Alexa.com

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.


Last Updated on Sunday, 10 April 2022 22:02

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The annual11th Congressional District Caucus Parade is Monday, September 2

11th Congressional District Congresswoman Marcia L. Fudge, a Warrensville Heights Democrat who also chairs the Congressional Black Caucus of Blacks in Congress. waives to the crowd last year at the annual 11th Congressional District Caucus Parade.  This year's parade kicks off on Monday, September 2 on Cleveland's east side at 10:00 am from E. 149th Street and Kinsman Road and ends at Luke Easter Park where the picnic will begin. The event will be replete with political speeches and entertainment from various sources, including local musicians and bands. The well-attended caucus parade was initiated by Democrat Louis Stokes, the retired congressman before Fudge, and the tradition was furthered by the late Democratic Congresswoman Stephanie Tubbs Jones, Fudges' predecessor. Stokes was the first Black congressperson from Ohio and Tubbs Jones was the first Black congresswoman from Ohio