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Led by coach Ted Ginn Sr., Glenville, a Cleveland public high school, wins a state football championship title in Ohio....A celebratory parade and motorcade are set for December 8, 2022

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Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com

CANTON, Ohio — Glenville High school, a school in Cleveland's largely Black public school system that is located on the city's majority Black east side, won the OHSAA Division IV championship title this past weekend in Canton over Cincinnati Wyoming, the first time in the 51-year history of the Ohio High School Athletic Association football that a school in the Cleveland Metropolitan School District, initially named the Cleveland Public School District, has won a state football championship title.(Editor's note: The school district will host a celebratory parade and motorcade on Thursday, December 8, 2022 from the high school beginning at 10 am It will be followed by an 11 am victory rally at Cleveland Public Hall where Mayor bibb is expected to speak, among others).

Led by longtime coach Ted Ginn Sr., and with  Damarion Witten at the helm as quarterback, Glenville  defeated Cincinnati Wyoming 26-6 to capture the Division IV state title, .one of seven OHSAA titles up for grabs over the weekend among seven divisions, all of the games played at the Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium in Canton beginning on Friday. It was Glenville’s third appearance in a state championship game.

Coming into Saturday's championship game, the Tarblooders had capped off a perfect 15-0 season for Glenville and coach Ginn, a Black coach.

After accepting the trophy on the stadium field after his team's spectacular win, Ginn, in talking to reporters, praised his players and called the win a win for Glenville and a "win for the community."

Coach Ginn led Glenville twice to the state title game but both times, in 2009 and 2013, the Tarblooders came up short.

The first  Glenville High School originally resided at the former Oliver Wendell Holmes school (then The Doan Building) which formerly sat on the northeast corner of E. 105th and St. Clair. It  later moved to Parkwood and Everton in October 1904 due to population growth at the time.The current building was built in 1964 and is located at E. 113th and St. Clair.

Cleveland's public school district, which had nearly 150,000 students in 1963 before the now defunct desegregation court order and court-ordered bussing of the 1980s and 1990s, today hardly has an enrollment of some 30, 000 students. Per state law the school district is controlled by the mayor, who appoints school board members . Before the mayoral control law took effect in 1998 such school board members were elected.

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Saturday, 10 December 2022 10:18

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The annual11th Congressional District Caucus Parade is Monday, September 2

11th Congressional District Congresswoman Marcia L. Fudge, a Warrensville Heights Democrat who also chairs the Congressional Black Caucus of Blacks in Congress. waives to the crowd last year at the annual 11th Congressional District Caucus Parade.  This year's parade kicks off on Monday, September 2 on Cleveland's east side at 10:00 am from E. 149th Street and Kinsman Road and ends at Luke Easter Park where the picnic will begin. The event will be replete with political speeches and entertainment from various sources, including local musicians and bands. The well-attended caucus parade was initiated by Democrat Louis Stokes, the retired congressman before Fudge, and the tradition was furthered by the late Democratic Congresswoman Stephanie Tubbs Jones, Fudges' predecessor. Stokes was the first Black congressperson from Ohio and Tubbs Jones was the first Black congresswoman from Ohio