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WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S RALLY AGAINST THE SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V. WADE

BELOW PICTURE: Women's March Cleveland Head Organizer Kathy Wray Coleman (2nd from left) leads 2,500 people in a march for reproductive rights on Oct 2, 2021 on Market Square in Cleveland, Ohio. It was one of the largest marches in the country that day. Photo and coverage by the Plain Dealer and Cleveland.com. CLICK HERE TO GO GO TO CLEVELAND.COM TO READ ON THE COVERAGE OF THE EVENT

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BELOW PICTURE AND UPDATE:

SATURDAY, JUNE 11, 2022-NOON-2PM

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS  TO BE ANNOUNCED

EVENT CONTACT TEL: WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND (216) 659-0473

Women's March Cleveland's Save Roe Rally & March for Civil

Rights and against the U.S. Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade

is Sat., June 11, 2022, noon- 2pm, City Hall steps in

Cleveland, Ohio, 600 Lakeside Avenue E  44114

CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE FACEBOOK EVENT PAGE FOR WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S RALLY & MARCH AGAINST THE U.S. SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V. WADE

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S RALLY & MARCH AGAINST THE U.S. SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V WADE AT MOBILIZEUS.COM




Former Minnesota cop Kim Potter gets only 2 years for killing Daunte Wright as Wright's mother calls the sentence racist, and unjust, and said that "a White lady's tears [Potter's] trumped justice".... By investigative reporter Kathy Wray Coleman

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Pictured are former Brooklyn Center police officer Kim Potter and twenty-year-old Daunte Wright

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com.

By Kathy Wray Coleman, editor-in-chief, associate publisher

BROOKLYN CENTER, Minnesota- A Minnesota judge  on Friday handed convicted former police officer Kim Potter a  lenient sentence of two years in prison for a jury conviction last year on both first and second degree manslaughter charges in the tragic shooting death of 20-year-old Daunte Wright in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota during a traffic stop arrest last spring, Potter, who is White, having faced up to 15 years behind bars.

The maximum sentence for first degree manslaughter is 15 years, and a $30,000 fine, and for second degree manslaughter, 10 years, and a $20,000 fine. Prosecutors had asked the judge, who literally cried and spoke out on behalf of Potter before issuing what Black leaders and the Wright family and its lawyer call racist and unfair, for a sentence beyond the sentencing guidelines of  6 to 8.5 years. Potter, 49, will be out of jail  and in home confinement in less than 16 months, the judge said, and with credit for time served since her conviction on Dec 21, 2021.

The controversial Asian judge in the case, Regina Chu, said Potter deserved less time than the 86 months prosecutors wanted because she did not intend to kill Wright when she pulled her gun rather than her taser, an assertion Black legal experts say is absurd, and not really relevant to sentencing guidelines since the charge itself, manslaughter, takes such into account. Critics who expected a greater sentence for a life that was taken recklessly and negligently  say also that there was no need to even put a taser on the Black man.

Speaking outside of the Hennepin County County Courthouse on Friday,  Wrights mother, Katie Wright, expressed outrage and  said that "today the justice system murdered my son all over again.”

She called Potter's apology and tears at sentencing bogus, and added that "a White lady's tears [Potter's] trumped justice."

The largely White jury that convicted Potter was comprised of six men and six women, two  of them Black, two Asian American, and the other nine jurors White.

Wright's mother said after the trial last year that she felt "every single emotion that you could imagine" as the verdict was read.

"I kind of let out a yelp, because it was built up in the anticipation of what was to come," she said.

Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison prosecuted the case on behalf of the state and said after last year's jury verdict that  Potter had been held accountable for Wright's death.

"Accountability is not justice. Justice is restoration. Justice would be restoring Daunte to life and making the Wright family whole again," Ellison told reporters.

The jury deliberated for 27 hours over a period of four days before reaching its celebrated verdict relative to the two week closely watched trial.

But Ellison said after Fridays sentencing that while he disagrees with it, he accepts Judge Chu's two-year sentence for Potter.

A biracial Black man, Wright was fatally shot by Potter on April 11 during a traffic stop over expired license plates, a dangling air freshener, and an attempted arrest for an outstanding arrest warrant in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota. After a brief struggle with officers, the young Black man, whom police claim resisted arrest, was shot at close range. He then drove off a short distance, but his vehicle collided with another and hit a concrete barrier. Officers pulled his body out of his car and administered CPR but were unsuccessful in their attempts to revive him. He was pronounced dead at the scene.


The following day, police said that Potter meant to use her Taser, but accidentally grabbed her gun instead, striking Wright with one shot to his chest. Two days later, Potter and then Brooklyn Center police chief Tim Gannon, who had publicly called the shooting death an accident, resigned from their positions and Potter fled her home after her address was leaked on social media.


The shooting and claims by police and higher ups that it was an accident sparked heightened protests in Brooklyn Center and renewed ongoing demonstrations against police brutality in the Minneapolis–Saint Paul metropolitan area, leading to citywide and regional curfews. Demonstrations also spread to cities across the United States.


A wrongful death lawsuit brought by Wright's family remains pending.  Wright, whose father is Black and mother, White, left behind an infant daughter.


Wright's  girlfriend, who was in the car with him when he was killed, was among those who testified at trial for the prosecution. She was visibly shaken if not hysterical at times as she recounted her version of the events that led to the deadly shooting of her boyfriend.
The defense argued at trial that Potter made a mistake and pulled her taser instead of her gun while prosecutors shot back, saying some mistakes have consequences and that Potter's so-called mistake was a crime of large magnitudes. At one point prosecutors suggested that Potter's alleged intention to use her taser was not even necessary as the defense claimed the former officer actually had a right to use deadly force, a contradiction brought forth even after Potter took the stand at trial and repeatedly cried and admitted her guilt and culpability.
Wright's shooting death, occurring simultaneously with the murder trial of George Floyd's killer a stone's throw away in a Minnesota courtroom, has made Minneapolis and its metropolitan area, inclusive of the suburban city of Brooklyn Center, the epicenter of excessive force shooting deaths of unarmed Black men like Floyd and Wright.

Activists and Black leaders, including members of Congress, say it is a clear indictment relative to the nation's racist and inept legal system and its negative and oppressive impact on Black people, and their families

A veteran cop before he was fired after killing Floyd on May 25, 2020 following an arrest for alleged forgery over a counterfeit $20 bill, Derek Chauvin, 46 White, was convicted on On June 25, 2021 of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter before a jury in the Minnesota Fourth Judicial District Court and  sentenced to 2212 years in prison. He is appealing his case.

Three other police officers at the scene who did nothing while Chauvin held his knee on the neck of the handcuffed Floyd for more than nine minutes until he killed him were also fired. Former officers J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane, and Tou Thao are on trial now on federal civil rights charges for failing to intervene in Floyd's murder. Chauvin pleaded guilty last December to federal charges of violating Floyd's civil rights by using unreasonable force and ignoring Floyd's  cries for help with prosecutors are seeking 25 years in that case when he is sentenced later this year.

The city of Minneapolis agreed to pay $27 million to settle a wrongful death lawsuit brought by Floyd's family.

clevelandurbannews.com and www.kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Saturday, 19 February 2022 23:31

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The annual11th Congressional District Caucus Parade is Monday, September 2

11th Congressional District Congresswoman Marcia L. Fudge, a Warrensville Heights Democrat who also chairs the Congressional Black Caucus of Blacks in Congress. waives to the crowd last year at the annual 11th Congressional District Caucus Parade.  This year's parade kicks off on Monday, September 2 on Cleveland's east side at 10:00 am from E. 149th Street and Kinsman Road and ends at Luke Easter Park where the picnic will begin. The event will be replete with political speeches and entertainment from various sources, including local musicians and bands. The well-attended caucus parade was initiated by Democrat Louis Stokes, the retired congressman before Fudge, and the tradition was furthered by the late Democratic Congresswoman Stephanie Tubbs Jones, Fudges' predecessor. Stokes was the first Black congressperson from Ohio and Tubbs Jones was the first Black congresswoman from Ohio